F1 2000

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Driving Guide

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Version 1.0


By
Jamie Stafford/Wolf Feather
FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM

Completed January 21, 2001

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CONTENTS
Spacing
Permissions
Introduction
Assumptions and Conventions
Settings
General Tips
The 2000 Courses
Course Difficulty and Drivability Rankings
Grand Prix of Australia: Albert Park
Grand Prix of Brazil: Interlagos
Grand Prix of San Marino: Imola
Grand Prix of Great Britain: Silverstone
Grand Prix of Spain: Catalunya
Grand Prix of Europe: Nurburgring
Grand Prix of Monaco: Monte Carlo (Temporary Street Circuit)
Grand Prix of Canada: Gilles Villeneuve
Grand Prix of France: Nevers Magny-Cours
Grand Prix of Austria: A1-Ring
Grand Prix of Germany: Hockenheim
Grand Prix of Hungary: Hungaroring
Grand Prix of Belgium: Spa-Francorchamps
Grand Prix of Italy: Monza
Grand Prix of the United States: Indianapolis
Grand Prix of Japan: Suzuka
Grand Prix of Malaysia: Sepang
Wrap-up
Contact Information

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SPACING
For optimum readability, this driving guide should be 
viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier.  
Check for font setting by making sure the numbers and letters 
below line up:

12345678901234567890123456
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

==============================================

PERMISSIONS
Permission is hereby granted for a user to download and/or 
print out a copy of this driving guide for personal use. 

This driving guide may only be posted on CheatCC.com; please 
contact me for permission to post elsewhere on the Internet. 

Should anyone wish to translate this driving guide into other 
languages (F1 2000 is also optimized for French and Spanish), 
please contact me for permission and provide me with a copy 
when complete (especially important so that I can improve my 
French and Spanish skills).  

This driving guide is the result of well over 150 hours of 
gameplay and approximately 40 (fortunately nonconsecutive) 
hours of writing and editing.  Plagiarism is therefore NOT 
tolerated!!!!!  

==============================================
==============================================

INTRODUCTION
Most likely, if you play F1 2000, then you are at least a 
casual fan of Formula 1 racing, and have at least basic 
knowledge of many or all of the currently-used F1 courses.  
That knowledge does indeed help when first playing F1 2000, 
and vice versa - extensive gameplay helps in determining 
where the drivers are on each course when races are 
televised.  

The main part of this driving guide provides information to 
help you to cleanly drive each course.  Even those who know 
the courses fairly well and/or play the game regularly can 
always use tips.  

==============================================

ASSUMPTIONS AND CONVENTIONS
Several of the official course and segment names used in F1 
racing include the use of characters which are not standard 
to the English language, on which the Internet and standard 
text-only documents are based.  In order to eliminate the 
potential for "strange characters" in a standard text-only 
document, these characters have not been used.  

This driving guide is designed with the assumption that you 
(the player) are playing with Dry Weather, Fuel Usage, Flags, 
Equipment Failures, and Damage all activated.  (Weather is 
randomized if Realistic Weather is chosen.)  Most important 
here is Flags; with the Flags option activated, shortcutting 
corners, driving too far off-course, passing another car when 
the yellow flag is displayed, and reckless driving (including 
driving backward during a race) will instigate a ten-second 
Stop-Go Penalty; driving backward results in an immediate 
Black Flag, ending your race).  It is not possible to 
"accumulate" multiple outstanding Stop-Go Penalties and then 
serve them all at once; if more than one Stop-Go Penalty is 
outstanding, you will be shown a Black Flag and be forced to 
end the race prematurely.  

According to the FIA's rules for F1 competition, a driver may 
make no more than three complete laps before serving a Stop-
Go Penalty once one has been assigned, or else the driver is 
shown the Black Flag.  However, if a Stop-Go Penalty is 
issued in the last five laps of a race and is unserved, the 
driver is instead penalized by adding twenty seconds to his 
or her overall time.  F1 2000 also follows the twenty-second 
penalty in this case, but only if the Stop-Go Penalty was 
assigned with less than three complete laps remaining in the 
race.  

Most racetracks outside the United States name the corners 
and even some straightaways.  Where these names are known, 
they will be included in parentheses and referenced in the 
explanatory text.  These names have been gathered from course 
maps available on the courses' official Web sites, my memory 
of how F1 races have been called by the TV sportscasters, 
and/or from the Training mode of F1 Championship Season 2000 
(the follow-up game to F1 2000, also by EA Sports).  To the 
extent possible, these names have been translated into 
English.  

==============================================

SETTINGS
During the Test Day, Practice, and Qualifying sessions, 
sitting in the Pits and pressing the Start button brings up 
an options screen.  Selecting "Car Setup" brings up dialogues 
to change Front Downforce, Rear Downforce, Gear Ratios, 
Steering Lock, Front Suspension, Rear Suspension, Brake 
Balance, and Ground Clearance (press the up and down buttons 
to switch between these dialogues).  For convention, this 
driving guide will use the following system to show these 
settings:

Ground Clearance: -1

These dialogues show seven small boxes.  The centermost box 
means a neutral setting.  The three boxes to the left mean 
progressively lower settings (negative), while the three 
boxes to the right mean progressively higher settings 
(positive).  The number indicates how many boxes in each 
direction the red square should move; a zero indicates a 
neutral setting.  Each course will have suggested settings 
for the above dialogues to help stabilize the chosen car for 
that course.  These are just suggestions, largely based upon 
my rather aggressive driving style; experiment and find the 
car set-up which works best for your driving style for each 
course.  

==============================================

GENERAL TIPS
In general, bumping other cars is a bad thing:  You might 
damage your own car, and, if it occurs too much, you may also 
receive a Stop-Go Penalty.  If you ram another car's backside 
at full speed, you will almost definitely receive a Stop-Go 
Penalty.  The best way to avoid Stop-Go Penalties is to keep 
at least two wheels on the approved driving surfaces 
(pavement and rumble strips) at all times, and to refrain 
from colliding with other cars.  

Normally, the best way to approach a turn is from the 
outside.  At the apex of the turn, your car should be as 
close as possible to the inside of the turn.  As you leave 
the turn, drive back toward the outside.  This is obviously 
made more difficult on really tight and/or blind corners, 
especially at Monaco.  

If playing with Fuel Usage activated, it may be a good idea 
to set your Pit Stops for late in the race.  This way, should 
you need to pit early to repair damage, you can also take on 
"extra" fuel at that time and eliminate a later-scheduled Pit 
Stop.  Note that this is not possible when serving a Stop-Go 
Penalty, as the Pit Crew is not permitted to touch the car 
while the Penalty is being served.  

Should you be fortunate enough to begin lapping the field, 
the backmarkers will usually stay out of your way.  However, 
this is not always the case, especially as you approach the 
cars in the points.  

Braking is of utmost importance, especially when approaching 
a tight chicane or a blind corner.  If you are not sure of 
where a corner is (especially with other cars in front of 
you), brake early.  For a real-world example of what can 
happen by missing a braking zone, refer to the 2000 Grand 
Prix of Italy at Monza (Lap 1, Roggia Chicane; this is the 
massive accident in which flying debris struck and killed a 
volunteer corner worker).  

Activating the Flags option in F1 2000 causes the game to use 
the same flags and related rules as an actual F1 race.  I 
have never been shown a Blue Flag (allow the car(s) behind to 
pass), but that does not mean that - in the right situation - 
you will not be shown a Blue Flag.  When shown a Yellow Flag, 
you are to slow down and not pass anyone until you see a 
Green Flag (normal racing conditions); however, when the 
Yellow Flag is displayed, you are certainly permitted to pass 
a vehicle with obvious problems, such as a car (usually 
Mazacane or Gene) with a blown engine.  

Amazingly, in F1 2000, a car can still be driven even after a 
wheel has fallen off!!!!!  If you lose a wheel, it will 
usually be on the front of the car, due to bumping another 
car or smashing against a barrier.  Turning the car toward 
the missing wheel (i.e., turning left if the left front wheel 
is missing) is not very difficult, but turning away from the 
missing wheel (turning right in this example) is nearly 
impossible at any speed faster than a snail's crawl.  
However, once any two wheels have separated from the car, the 
race immediately ends.  

It is rare that your rear wing will ever be damaged; the most 
probable means of damaging the rear wing is spinning and 
hitting a barrier or another car with the backside of your 
vehicle.  However, if you are too aggressive or are not 
careful entering the Pit Lane (especially if coming in at 
full speed at Monza), you may damage your front wing.  If a 
wing only has "a slight knock" and is labeled yellow in the 
damage indicator, you can still drive normally, although 
serious caution must be taken on downhill turns (such as the 
first corner at Hungaroring).  If a wing comes off the car, 
don't plan on taking corners at any respectable speed, and 
passing other vehicles becomes nearly impossible even in a 
straight line due to the improper flow of air around your 
car.  

If playing the Championship mode, points are awarded for the 
top six cars at the end of the race; these points are given 
to the driver (for the Drivers Championship) and the team 
(for the Constructors Championship).  The points are awarded 
as follows, in accordance with FIA regulations:

First Place:    10 points
Second Place:    6 points
Third Place:     4 points
Fourth Place:    3 points
Fifth Place:     2 points
Sixth Place:     1 point

Thus, if you are concerned about winning the Constructors 
Championship, race as a driver for an historically good team, 
such as Ferrari or McClaren.  

Whichever driver and team you select to represent you in the 
race, you will periodically be given updates as to your 
teammate's status during the race (i.e., if you race as Jean 
Alesi, you will be given status updates on Nick Heidfeld's 
track position and pitting schedule).  It is extremely 
important to listen to this information, especially during 
the window(s) for pit stops, as each team can only service 
one car at a time in Pit Lane.  If you come into Pit Lane 
while your teammate is being serviced, you cannot pit and 
will be forced to drive straight through Pit Lane without 
receiving serviceŠ which itself will likely set you back 
severely in track position, but you will also be set back 
even further when you come around again to make your true pit 
stop.  

If you are a visually-oriented person, it may help you to go 
to the FIA's official Web site (http://www.fia.com/ - the 
site is available in both English and in French) and go to 
the current season's race schedule.  From here, the official 
Web sites (available in at least English and the host 
country's official languages; sometimes other language 
options are also available) of most of the race circuits can 
be accessed, and course maps can be downloaded and printed 
for you to study.  Note that some online course maps are in 
very high resolution, thus file size is large; this may be a 
concern for those using a slow computer and/or modem.  

Always use caution when passing, cornering, or even 
breathing, as auto racing is an inherently dangerous sport!!!

==============================================

THE 2000 COURSES
F1 2000 presents the courses in the order in which they were 
presented for the 2000 Formula 1 season.  This driving guide 
will follow the same convention, which will be especially 
useful for those playing the Championship Mode.

F1 Race Schedule, 2000 Season:
March 12      Australia      Albert Park
March 26      Brazil         Interlagos
April 9       San Marino     Imola
April 23      Great Britain  Silverstone
May 7         Spain          Catalunya
May 21        Europe         Nurburgring
June 4        Monaco         Unnamed (Street Circuit)
June 18       Canada         Gilles Villeneuve
July 2        France         Nevers Magny-Cours
July 16       Austria        A1-Ring
July 30       Germany        Hockenheim
August 13     Hungary        Hungaroring
August 27     Belgium        Spa-Francorchamps
September 10  Italy          Monza
September 24  USA            Indianapolis   
October 8     Japan          Suzuka
October 22    Malaysia       Kuala Lumpur

NOTE: The 2001 F1 race schedule has been posted and is now 
available at the FIA Web site (http://www.fia.com/). The race 
schedule also has links to the official Web sites of most of 
the permanent and temporary street circuits hosting F1 races.  
Please note that the 2001 race schedule uses the same courses 
as the 2000 season (on which F1 2000 is based), but in a 
different order.  For example, the Grand Prix of Malaysia was 
the final race of the 2000 season, but is the second race of 
the 2001 season.  

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COURSE DIFFICULTY AND DRIVABILITY RANKINGS 
This section is highly subjective - take this information 
with several grains of salt.  The courses here are listed by 
their order in the 2000 F1 racing season.  

Australia           Easy            Extreme fun
Brazil              Medium          Lower course frustrating
Imola               Medium          Fun
Silverstone         Medium          Good
Catalunya           Easy            Fun
Nurburgring         Medium          Somewhat
                                    Frustrating
Monaco              VERY DIFFICULT  HIGHLY ANNOYING
Gilles Villeneuve   Medium          Fun
Nevers Magny-Cours  Easy            Quite fun
A1-Ring             Medium          Very challenging
Hockenheim          Easy            Fun and FAST
Hungaroring         Medium          Upper course
                                    challenging, but
                                    fun overall
Spa-Francorchamps   Medium          Enjoyably challenging
Monza               Easy            Fun and FAST
Indianapolis        Medium          Depends on set-up
Suzuka              Medium          Fun challenge
Kuala Lumpur        Medium          Not too bad

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GRAND PRIX OF AUSTRALIA: ALBERT PARK
This course is built around the beautiful Albert Park Lake.  
As you drive around the eastern shore of the lake, you can 
see people enjoying themselves on the lake to your right.  
There are usually plenty of trees on both sides of the track, 
with a nice view of Melbourne's buildings as you come through 
Turns 12 and 13.  The Albert Park circuit features many long, 
gentle, no-braking corners, allowing for incredible top-end 
speed.  However, these are tempered with several moderate- 
and hard-braking corners.  

Suggested Set-up:
Front Downforce: -1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: The front straight is fairly long, following a 
light-braking corner (Turn 16).  However, Turn 1 requires an 
early braking zone.  

Turn 1: A moderate-braking right-hand corner.  If you miss 
the braking zone here, there is a wide area in which you can 
recover, and a long run-off area.  Traffic will often bunch 
up entering Turn 1.  

Turn 2: Immediately following Turn 1, this is a gentle left-
hand turn which can be taken at full speed.  Excellent 
acceleration out of Turn 1 makes the exit of Turn 2 and the 
ensuing straightaway a prime passing zone.  

Turn 3: This is a hard-braking right-hand corner following a 
long straightaway.  Again, there is a wide recovery area 
here, as well as an extended run-off lane.  A little speed 
can be made coming out of Turn 3, but the straightaway is 
virtually non-existent, requiring moderate braking for Turn 
4.  This is definitely NOT a place to pass (safely).  Traffic 
tends to bunch up here for Turns 3 and 4.  

Turn 4: A left-hand corner requiring at least moderate 
braking.  To the outside of the corner is a wide, paved 
recovery area; however, driving too far out to the right will 
result in a Stop-Go Penalty.  Good acceleration out of Turn 4 
can set up a good passing opportunity.  

Turn 5: A gentle right-hand corner through the trees which 
leads to a nice straightaway.  No braking is necessary here.  

Turn 6: A semi-hidden moderate-braking right-hand corner.  
Traffic will sometimes bunch up here, as drivers try to spot 
the corner.  A wide recovery zone is available here as well.  

Turn 7: Immediately following Turn 6, Turn 7 is a very gentle 
left-hand corner which brings you alongside the northernmost 
end of Albert Park Lake.  

Turn 8: This is almost not a turn at all, as it curves 
extremely gently along the shoreline. 

Turn 9: The first piece of pavement to the right is NOT the 
official corner; taking this bypass area results in a Stop-Go 
Penalty.  The official corner is a tight right-hand turn 
which requires moderate or hard braking.  Traffic almost 
always bunches up here.  

Turn 10: This is almost not a turn at all, as it curves 
extremely gently to the left and back along the shoreline.  
There is absolutely NO room for error on the right side of 
the track, as the pavement runs directly up against the 
barrier.  The view of Albert Park Lake is quite serene from 
here, but don't take your eyes off the course!!!

Turns 11 and 12: If you are not navigating traffic, Turns 11 
and 12 can be taken at full speed, although some drivers may 
feel more comfortable with tapping the brakes once in each 
turn.  However, sliding even one pixel across the rumble 
strips on either side of the road results in a Stop-Go 
Penalty.  

Straightaway: The pavement runs directly up against the 
barrier on he left side of the course here, creating problems 
for cars on the left whose engines suddenly expire.  

Turn 13: This is a semi-blind right-hand corner requiring 
moderate braking if you are alone; traffic tends to bunch up 
here.  The recovery area again is quite wide, with an 
extremely long run-off area if needed.  This leads to a short 
straightaway which can be a prime passing zone if 
acceleration out of Turn 13 is strong.  

Turn 14: A light-braking, right-hand corner with a wide 
recovery area.  This is a good place to pass on braking upon 
entering the corner.  

Turn 15: Do not be fooled by the run-off lane which goes 
directly ahead into an unforgiving barrier; there IS a turn 
to the left here requiring moderate braking.  This is also a 
good place to pass on braking when entering the corner.  Note 
that the Pit Entry is immediately to the right upon exiting 
the corner, to be sure to look for cars moving slower than 
expected as they enter Pit Lane.  

Turn 16: Without traffic, this right-hand corner can be taken 
at full speed if you slowed enough in Turn 15.  But, be 
careful with the approach and exit angles for this turn, as 
the barrier (and a grandstand) is just a few feet off the 
pavement on the left as you exit the corner.  This leads onto 
the Pit Straight.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins immediately after Turn 15. It 
is possible to enter at a fairly high speed, but there will 
be a turn to the right very quickly, requiring moderate 
braking.  Before entering the main Pit area, however, is a 
right-left chicane, so be prepared to truly slam on the 
brakes, or else the nose of your car will slam into the Pit 
Lane barrier.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF BRAZIL: INTERLAGOS
Most F1 courses are driven clockwise; built on a steep 
hillside, Interlagos is driven counter-clockwise.  There are 
two main set-up options here: low-downforce for high speeds, 
and high-downforce for better cornering.  The upper part of 
the course features long segments of flat-out, full-throttle, 
top-speed driving, which is prime for low-downforce set-ups.  
However, the lower part of the course (where the most clock 
time is spent) features tight corners and several significant 
elevation changes, so high-downforce set-ups are highly 
beneficial here.  

Suggested Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

NOTE: This suggested car set-up is for a high-downforce set-
up, to take advantage of passing under braking on the lower 
part of the course.  

Pit Straight: This is the highest point of the course in 
terms of elevation.  There is no room to pull off the course 
here if there is a problem with a car.  This is also the 
fastest portion of the course, leading into the most 
dangerous corner at Interlagos.  There are several left-hand 
fades along the "Pit Straight."  This "straightaway" is the 
longest stretch of flat-out acceleration of this course.  The 
optimal racing line is hard to the left, so be careful not to 
rub the left-side tires against the barriers.  The Pit 
Entrance is also to the left, and cars may enter here at top 
speed.

Turn 1 (S do Senna): Especially since this corner follows an 
incredibly long and fast "Pit Straight," this is by far the 
most dangerous turn on the course.  This is a tight, left-
hand, semi-blind, downhill corner requiring severe braking 
long before reaching the turn.  Unless you have PERFECT 
confidence in your car's braking AND turning ability, this is 
definitely NOT a place to pass!!!  For those who overrun the 
corner, there is a sizeable patch of kitty litter, but there 
is also a two-level barrier; the first barrier is a short 
segment, so it is possible (if necessary) to drive behind 
this first barrier and come out on the other side in the 
middle of Turn 3.  

Turn 2 (S do Senna): This follows immediately after Turn 1.  
This right-hand corner can be taken at full speed (unless 
slower traffic blocks the path) to set up prime passing 
opportunities in Curva du Sol or along the following 
straightaway.  Amazingly, there is a small paved path between 
the main track and the Pit Lane where the old Pit Lane met 
the course (drivers used to rejoin the race at the outside of 
Turn 2).  F1 2000 does not penalize you for leaving the main 
course via this short piece of pavement and driving along the 
rest of the Pit Lane, which makes this a great method for 
passing a large group of cars at once (the Pit Lane rejoins 
the course just beyond the exit of Turn 3); however, extreme 
caution must be taken not to ram the barrier on the left of 
the Pit Lane when attempting this maneuver at full speed.  

Turn 3 (Curva du Sol): Immediately following S do Senna, Turn 
3 is a gentle left-hand corner which can also be taken at top 
speed.  Just beyond the exit of Turn 3, the Pit Lane rejoins 
the main course on the left.  Curva du Sol leads into yet 
another long straightaway.  

Turn 4 (Lago): This corner begins the lower portion of the 
course in terms of elevation.  Lago is a semi-hidden left-
hand corner with a slight downward slope.  Moderate braking 
is necessary here to keep from sliding the car into the 
recovery zone.  Good acceleration out of Lago sets up great 
passing in the next corner and along the following 
straightaway.  

Turn 5: A gentle left-hand turn, this can be taken at full 
throttle.  The course begins to slope upward again.  

Straightaway: This is effectively the last straightaway 
before the Pit Straight at the beginning of the course.  The 
course here slopes upward, so cars with excellent 
acceleration out of Turns 4 and 5 can pass those with poor 
uphill speed.  

Turn 6 (Laranjinha): This is the beginning of a pair of 
right-hand corners which effectively form a "U" shape.  The 
entry of this corner can be taken at full throttle, but be 
ready to touch the brakes at the exit of this corner.  Turn 6 
is also on the crown of a hill.  

Turn 7 (Laranjinha): The final corner of a "U" shape in the 
course, this is a right-hand decreasing-radius corner with a 
gentle downward slope.  

Turn 8 (Curva do S): After an almost negligible straightaway, 
this right-hand corner requires moderate braking.  The course 
also begins to slope downhill at the beginning of Turn 8.  
Pinheirinho immediately follows.

Turn 9 (Pinheirinho): Immediately upon exiting Turn 8, slam 
on the brakes again for the sharp left-hand Pinheirinho.  
This is potentially a good place to pass other cars, 
especially if using a high-downforce set-up.  Turn 9 is a 
long corner, however, so it is important to hug the apex 
longer than usual.  The exit of Pinheirinho leads to an 
upward-sloping straightaway.  

Turn 10 (Bica do Pato): The entrance of Turn 10 begins the 
final downward slope of the course, making this right-hand 
corner even more difficult to navigate.  Heavy braking and 
excellent hands are required to maneuver the car safely 
through this corner.  Good acceleration is needed exiting 
Bica do Pato to pass traffic in the next corner and ensuing 
straightaway.  The kitty litter is available if you overshoot 
the corner, but you will quickly find yourself rubbing 
against a barrier.  

Turn 11 (Mergulho): This left-hand corner almost immediately 
follows Bica do Pato and can be taken flat-out to provide 
good speed along the next (very short) straightaway.  Good 
acceleration out of Turn 10 makes this a good passing zone if 
you have a decent racing line, otherwise you may find 
yourself off the course on the outside of the corner.  

Turn 12 (Juncao): This is a tight left-hand corner requiring 
moderate to heavy braking.  The final, steep uphill slope 
begins here, and the exit of the corner is hidden (even in 
chase view).  It is extremely easy to run off the outside of 
the corner here, but a small patch of grass and another paved 
lane provide run-off relief here.  This corner leads to the 
incredibly long Pit Straight.  
 
Pit Exit: The Pit Lane once emptied onto the exit of Turn 2; 
it now rejoins the main course just after the exit of Curva 
du Sol.  This makes Pit Lane extremely longŠ and F1 2000 
refuses to give you control of your car until you are 
effectively past Turn 2.  This fact makes it extremely 
important to select your pit strategy carefully in long 
races.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF SAN MARINO: IMOLA
The Imola circuit is challenging but rather fun.  Again, this 
is a "counterclockwise" circuit, but, oddly, the Pits and 
Paddock are located on the outside of the circuit and not on 
the inside.  There is extremely little tolerance for 
shortcutting the chicanes, and Turn 6 (Tosa) is essentially a 
blind corner unless traffic is present to mark the course for 
you.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: This is a long straightaway, which enables high 
speeds as the cars cross the Start/Finish Line.  Good exit 
speed out of the final chicane makes for prime passing and a 
good show for the spectators.  The Pit Straight fades to the 
left at the end of Pit Lane (which is aligned with the 
Start/Finish Line).  Once past the Pits, there is a barrier 
directly against the right side of the track.  

Turns 1 and 2 (Tamburello): This is a left-right chicane.  
Turn 1 requires moderate braking, but if you slow enough in 
Turn 1, you should be able to drive at full throttle through 
Turn 2 and beyond.  There is slight tolerance for cutting the 
corners here, but not much.  If you try to take the entire 
chicane at full speed, you can make it through Turn 1 fairly 
well, but you will quickly find yourself in the grass on the 
outside of Turn 2 and banging against the nearby barrier.  If 
you completely miss the braking zone for Turn 1, there is a 
huge sand trap to help you recover.  

Turn 3 (Tamburello): Immediately following Turn 2, Tamburello 
is a soft left-hand corner which can be taken at full speed.  
Good acceleration out of Turn 1 makes this a good passing 
zone.  Following this corner is a significant straightaway.  

Turns 4 and 5 (Villeneuve): This is another left-right 
chicane, but not as lengthy as the first.  Without traffic to 
navigate, this chicane can be taken at top speed with no 
braking and without risk of shortcutting either corner, but 
care must be taken not to slide off the course at the exit of 
Turn 5.  The course slopes upward at the exit of this 
chicane.  

Turn 6 (Tosa): This is a blind left-hand corner which 
continues the upward slope of the course.  Moderate or even 
severe braking is required here, or else your car will be in 
the kitty litter and headed toward the grandstands.  Traffic 
is actually a benefit in approaching this corner, as the 
course is largely hidden from view, but other cars are easy 
to see.  If any mistake is to be made here, it is to shortcut 
the corner, as the CPU is actually quite tolerant on this 
corner.  

Straightaway: The course continues up the hill here, cresting 
underneath the overhead Firestone advertisement.  Just beyond 
the ad, the track fades to the right as it begins its gentle 
downward slope, but then leads directly into Piratella.

Turn 7 (Piratella): The course continues downward here, with 
the slope increasing.  This is a left-hand semi-blind corner.  
It is rather easy to slip off the pavement here and into the 
kitty litter on the outside of the corner.  Any passing done 
here is best made tight to the apex of the corner, perhaps 
with only the right-side wheels on the pavement or rumble 
strip.  

Turn 8: Barely a corner at all but more than a fade, the 
course gently turns to the left here as the track passes 
under an Arexons banner.  This is a full-speed "corner."  

Turns 9 and 10 (Mineralli): This is a pair of right-hand 
corners which effectively function as a decreasing-radius "U" 
formation.  Turn 9 can be taken at full speed, but upon exit 
to the outside of Turn 9, heavy braking is needed and extra 
steering to the right is required to safely navigate around 
the decreasing-radius Turn 10.  The track begins another 
(steep) uphill slope in Turn 10.  Tightly hugging the apex 
allows for prime passing through Turn 10.  Care must be taken 
not to enter Turn 10 too fast, or else you will be off the 
course on the left.  If you do find yourself off-course, you 
MUST turn sharply to the right to get back onto the pavement, 
as Turn 11 immediately follows and the CPU allows virtually 
no tolerance here for shortcutting.  

Turn 11 (Mineralli): Immediately following Turn 10, the left-
hand Turn 11 continues the upward slope of the course.  There 
is almost no CPU tolerance for shortcutting here, to it is 
very important to remain on-course here.  Care must be taken 
not to slip off to the right of the track as you pass 
underneath the EA Sports banner.  

Turns 12-13 (Alta Chicane): This is a right-left chicane, 
beginning underneath the EuroBusiness banner.  Although there 
is NO tolerance for shortcutting here, this chicane can be 
easily taken at full speed; however, other cars generally 
slow significantly for this chicane, so a full-speed maneuver 
here in traffic is not advised.  The barrier to the outside 
of Turn 13 is very close to the track, so be careful not to 
slip of the course.  

Straightaway: The course begins its final downhill slope 
here, fading gently first to the left, then to the right.  

Turns 14 and 15 (Rivazza): This is a left-hand "U" formation.  
Moderate braking is required entering Turn 14, but then Turn 
15 can be taken at full speed, although some may feel more 
comfortable lightly tapping the brakes here.  Caution must be 
taken to use enough braking entering the "U" formation, or 
else you will end up in the sand on the right side of the 
track.  

Straightaway: This is the final long straightaway before 
reaching the Pit Straight.  However, the official course 
fades to the right just after passing underneath the Helix 
banner; driving straight ahead (the pavement of the old 
course) and thus missing the entire final chicane results in 
a Stop-Go Penalty.  The end of this straightaway provides two 
options: 1.) Keep driving straight ahead onto Pit Lane; 2.) 
Turn left for the final chicane.  

Turns 16 and 17 (Bassa Chicane): This is the final chicane 
(left-right) of the course.  There is no tolerance for 
shortcutting here.  To the outside of Turn 16 is the Pit Lane 
entry, so be mindful of slower cars entering Pit Lane as you 
approach the chicane.  Moderate braking is required entering 
Turn 16, but then Turn 17 can usually be taken at full speed 
onto the Pit Straight.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF GREAT BRITAIN: SILVERSTONE
For the 2000 F1 season, the British Grand Prix was moved up 
in the racing calendar, and resulted in a very wet weekend 
(although the race itself was semi-sunny).  Built on an 
airport site, this historic course features wide run-off 
areas in most places.  At last, this course is a return to 
normal, clockwise racing.    

Set-up:
Front Downforce: -1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

Pit Straight: The Start/Finish Line is directly at the 
beginning of the Pit Straight.  There is no room for error on 
the right side of the track, as the Pit Lane barrier is 
directly against the pavement.  

Turn 1 (Copse): This is a moderate right-hand corner which 
can be taken at full speed, but be careful to not run off the 
course at the exit of the turn.  The best racing line is to 
tightly hug the apex, but the Pit Lane barrier is right there 
against the pavement, so it is imperative to keep the right-
side tires from rubbing the barrier.  Turn 1 exits onto a 
long straightaway.  

Straightaway: The Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the 
right about 1/3 of the way along the straight.  

Turns 2-5 (Bechetts): This is a set of left-right-left-right 
"S" curves. Turns 2 and 4 can be taken at full speed, but 
Turns 3 and 5 require moderate or even heavy braking.   

Turn 6 (Chapel): This is a gentle left-hand corner which can 
be taken at full speed.  This opens onto Hangar Straight.

Straightaway (Hangar Straight): At 738.28m, this is the 
longest straightaway of the course.  Good acceleration out of 
Turn 5 (the final "S" curve) can lead to good passing 
opportunities along Hangar Straight and/or entering the 
braking zone for Turn 7 (Stowe).  To your left is the Roger 
Clark Circuit, owned and operated by the same organization 
which owns and operates this Grand Prix Circuit.  

Turn 7 (Stowe): If you have sufficient downforce, this corner 
can be taken at full speed; otherwise, light or moderate 
braking will be required here in order to remain on the 
pavement.  This is a sweeping right-hand corner followed 
immediately by a left-hand semi-corner.  This is the 
southernmost point of the course.  

Straightaway (Vale): If you use a high-downforce set-up and 
can successfully navigate Turn 7 (Stowe) without braking, 
then you should be able to continue passing others fairly 
easily along Vale, especially if they use a low-downforce 
set-up and had to brake through Stowe.  

Turns 8 and 9 (Club): There is a stretch of pavement to the 
left, but that is NOT the official course; in fact, it has a 
tall barrier blocking a clear path for those who wish to 
accumulate a Stop-Go Penalty.  The official corner is a tight 
left-hand turn followed by the increasing-radius right-hand 
Turn 9, leading out onto another long straightaway (Abbey 
Straight).  

Turns 10 and 11 (Abbey): Like the previous set of corners, 
there is another stretch of pavement to the left which is not 
part of the official course; as before, this patch of 
pavement is blocked by a tall barrier, and taking this route 
will accumulate a Stop-Go Penalty.  The official Turn 10 is a 
tight left-hand corner, but not as tight as Turn 8.  This is 
immediately followed by a light-braking Turn 11, a right-hand 
corner.  Be careful not to slip off the course and rub the 
nearby barrier on exiting Turn 11.  

Straightaway (Farm Straight): With good acceleration out of 
Abbey, good passing opportunities can be made here.  

Turn 12 (Bridge): Immediately after passing underneath the 
pedestrian bridge, you will enter a complex similar to The 
Stadium at Hokkenheim.  This is a right-hand corner which can 
be taken at full speed with almost all set-ups.  

Turn 13 (Priory): With the suggested race set-up, this left-
hand corner will require light braking.  With a high-
downforce set-up, no braking should be necessary.  

Turn 14 (Brooklands): Another left-hand corner, this one 
requires moderate braking with any set-up.  There is a small 
sand trap for those who miss the braking zone.  

Turn 15 (Luffield): This set of right-hand corners 
essentially form a "U" shape, and both require moderate or 
severe braking to avoid sliding off into the kitty litter.  
The exit of Luffield can be taken flat-out all the way to 
Turn 3.  The entry to Pit Lane is on the left shortly leaving 
Luffield.  

Turn 16 (Woodcote): Barely a corner but more than a fade, the 
course eases to the right here.  At the exit of the corner is 
the Start/Finish Line, and the right-side barrier begins 
abruptly here (be careful not to hit it).  In F1 2000, be 
careful not to drive to the right of the official course; you 
will not be given a Stop-Go Penalty here, but if you drive 
over the painted advertisement, your car will slow 
noticeably.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF SPAIN: CATALUNYA
The Catalunya circuit is challenging, especially the two 
hairpins and the "J" turns.  For observers and drivers alike, 
plenty of action can be found at the Spanish Grand Prix.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: -1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: As usual, incredible speeds can be attained 
here.  Watch for cars rejoining the race from the right side 
of the straightaway.  

Turn 1 (Elf): This is a right-hand corner which can only be 
taken flat-out if using a high-downforce set-up, which is not 
advisable for the Catalynua circuitŠ even then, it requires 
quick reflexes and a flawless racing line to keep from 
sliding off the course.  Otherwise, light braking is required 
here.  Be careful not to hug the inside of the corner too 
tightly, or you will damage your right-side tires on the 
barrier.  Strong acceleration out of Turn 1 creates great 
passing opportunities all the way to Repsol.  

Turn 2 (Elf): Immediately following Turn 1, the left-hand 
Turn 2 can usually be taken at top acceleration.  With strong 
acceleration out of Turn 1, this is a prime passing zone.  

Turn 3 (Seat): A sweeping right-hand increasing-radius corner 
which can be taken at full speed, this is also a good place 
to pass slower cars.  

Turn 4 (Repsol): This is a semi-blind right-hand hairpin 
corner which requires moderate or heavy braking.  The barrier 
on the inside of the corner rests almost directly against the 
track.  This can actually be a good place to pass, but only 
with extreme caution.  Don't come too hot into this corner or 
else you will find yourself in the sand.  After clearing the 
first 90 degrees, you should be able to accelerate fairly 
well if you are not encumbered by traffic.  

Turn 5: After a very short straightaway, this is a semi-blind 
left-hand hairpin, a bit tighter than Turn 4.  Moderate or 
heavy braking will be needed here, or you will definitely be 
using the recovery area.  

Straightaway: This straightaway fades to the left.  Good 
acceleration out of Turn 5 can create passing opportunities, 
especially in the braking zone for Wuth.  

Turn 6 (Wuth): With a good racing line, you should be able to 
brake lightly to clear this semi-blind left-hand turn.  
Beware the barrier on the inside of the corner.  The angle of 
the rumble strip along the apex in relation to the short 
patch of grass is rather odd; if you roll your left-side 
tires onto the grass, you may quickly lose control of the 
car, causing the vehicle to slide or even spin.  The exit of 
Wuth has an immediate fade to the right.  

Turn 7 (Campsa): This right-hand corner can be taken at full 
speed.  Note that the official circuit is to the right; do 
not drive directly ahead on another patch of pavement or you 
will be assigned a Stop-Go Penalty.  

Turn 8 (La Cacsa): Severe braking is required for this left-
hand corner.  While not suggested, you may be able to pass 
other cars on braking here.  As with Wuth, stay off the 
rumble strips and grass on the inside of the turn, or you 
will risk losing control of the car.  This is a "J" turn, and 
the corner seems to go on forever before you reach the exit.  

Turn 9 (Banc Sabadeau): Shortly following Turn 8, moderate or 
heavy braking will be needed here for the right-hand, upward-
sloping corner.  This is also a "J" turn.  If you need a 
recovery area anywhere on the course, it will most likely be 
here.  

Turn 10: Light braking may be needed for this right-hand 
corner.  The key here is to truly hug the inside of the turn 
and accelerate strongly through the exit.  Watch for slow 
cars here preparing to go to Pit Lane for servicing.  

Turn 11: Entering this right-hand corner, the Pit Lane begins 
on the right, so be on the lookout for very slow cars here.  
If you take this final corner too tightly, or make a VERY 
late decision to go to the pits, you will likely damage the 
front of the car on a barrier.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF EUROPE: NURBURGRING
>From a driving standpoint, the hilly Nurburgring circuit is 
very much characterized by its tight corners.  Thus, tire 
wear is a definite issue in long races here.  Even more 
important, however, is braking early for almost every corner; 
perhaps only the streets of Monaco require more braking than 
does the Nurburgring circuit.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

Pit Straight: This straightaway is fairly long, but the 
Start/Finish Line is near the exit of the final corner.  The 
Pit Lane rejoins the course near the end of the Pit Straight, 
just before the Castrol S.

Turns 1 and 2 (Castrol S): Light or moderate braking is 
required before entering the right-left "S" curve.  It is 
quite easy to miss seeing the entry to the Castrol S unless 
traffic is present to mark the corner for you.  Until you 
know the course really well, expect to find yourself driving 
straight ahead into the recovery area.  Also, be careful not 
to drive too wide exiting the Castrol S.  

Turn 3: Light braking will be necessary for this left-hand 
corner, unless using a high-downforce set-up.  With any set-
up, however, hard braking will be required for the Ford 
Curve.  Beginning at the top of Turn 3, the course moves 
downhill.  

Turn 4 (Ford Curve): This is a hard right-hand corner, 
practically a "J" curve.  The course resumes an uphill slope 
here.  Braking too late here means a trip through the kitty 
litter, while riding up on the inside rumble strips usually 
means losing control of the car.  This is definitely NOT a 
place to pass unless absolutely necessary.  

Straightaway: The course fades to the left here.  If you can 
accelerate well out of the Ford Curve, you should be able to 
pass several cars here.  

Turn 5 (Dunlop Curve): Severe braking for this hairpin is a 
mustŠ unless you really want to drive through the sand.  
Again, rolling up on the rumble strips on the inside of the 
curve will likely cause you to lose control of the car.  The 
course continues gently uphill here toward the Audi S.  

Turns 6 and 7 (Audi S): Entering the left-right Audi S, the 
uphill slope of the course increases, making it very 
difficult to see the course more than a few feet ahead.  The 
exit of Turn 6 is the crest of this hill; Turn 7 begins a 
slight downhill slope.  Unless traffic blocks your racing 
line, the entire Audi S can be taken at top speed, so good 
acceleration out of the Dunlop Curve will be very beneficial 
for passing exiting Turn 7.  

Turn 8 (RTL Curve): With the rise in the course entering the 
left-hand RTL Curve, this appears to be identical to Turn 6 
on approach.  However, you MUST use moderate braking entering 
the RTL Curve, of you will definitely by on the grass on the 
outside of the curve.  This corner is followed by the gentler 
BIT Curve.  

Turn 9 (BIT Curve): This right-hand curve quickly follows the 
RTL Curve, forming an "S" curve.  If you have a good racing 
line exiting the RTL Curve, you should be able to speed 
through the BIT Curve without any problem.  

Turn 10 (Bilstein-Bogen): This is a gentle right-hand semi-
corner which can be taken at full throttle.  From here to the 
Veedal S, the course makes its final and steepest upward 
slope.  

Turns 11 and 12 (Veedal S): This is an extremely tight left-
right made even worse for the drivers by its placement at the 
very crest of the hill.  For those who overshoot the chicane, 
there is a patch of pavement which bypasses the chicane and 
rejoins the main course, but those taking this route are 
greeted with a Stop-Go Penalty.  Only experts can fly through 
the Veedal S at full speed; even then, this requires a high-
downforce set-up which may not be very beneficial overall due 
to the course's long straightaways.  

Turn 13 (Coca-Cola Curve): A "J" turn to the right, moderate 
braking is required here to keep from sliding off the course.  
The entry of the Coca-Cola Curve is also where the Pit Lane 
begins, so cars may be slowing on approach to go to the pits 
for servicing.  This is the final corner of the course.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins at the entry of the final 
corner.  It is extremely important to slow down before 
entering Pit Lane; if you come in too fast, you will almost 
certainly damage the front of the car on the barrier.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF MONACO: MONTE CARLO (TEMPORARY STREET CIRCUIT)
"To finish first, first you must finish."  The Monaco circuit 
is a highly daunting temporary street course, especially from 
the Driver View or the Front Wing View, as the barriers are 
FAR too close for comfort, and passing is virtually 
impossible for even expert drivers.  If there is a problem 
with a car, there are extremely few places to pull off the 
course, so all drivers must be wary of damaged vehicles, 
especially slow or stationary cars around the many blind 
corners.  The most significant key to simply finishing a race 
at Monaco is SURVIVAL, which means a slow, methodical, 
patient race.  Aggressive drivers (like myself) would almost 
certainly end up dead - or at least driving an extremely 
beat-up vehicle - driving the Monaco circuit for real!!!  For 
a comparison, the Surfer's Paradise circuit in Newman-Haas 
Racing is a sweet dream compared to the Monaco circuit!!!!!  

Given the handling and physics parameters of F1 2000, this is 
by far the most difficult circuit in the game, precisely due 
to the infinite closeness of the barriers; those who have 
done well on the Monaco course in other incarnations of F1 
racing games may be extremely disappointed with their results 
at Monaco in F1 2000.  While this is not an option in 
Championship Mode once the Championship has begun, it may be 
best to attempt to conquer this course with Damage and Tire 
Wear off.  

Tip: F1 2000 allows you to toggle the Fuel/Damage Indicator 
on and off at will.  When driving at Monaco, this Indicator 
should be on at ALL times.  This course is so unbelievably 
TIGHT that even the most cautious of drivers will likely bump 
a barrier (or another car) fairly oftenŠ and all those bumps 
WILL eventually take their toll.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +3
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -1
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: +1

Pit Straight: Not straight at all, the "Pit Straight" fades 
to the right along its entire length.  Near the end, the Pit 
Lane rejoins the main course from the right.  

Turn 1 (Sainte Devote): This is a tight right-hand semi-blind 
corner; heavy braking is required long before reaching Sainte 
Devote.  To the left on entering this corner is one of the 
few areas to pull off the course if there is a problem.  The 
uphill portion of the course begins here.  

Straightaway (Beau Rivage): Not really straight with its 
varying-direction fades, the circuit climbs steeply uphill 
here.  Because of the fades, this is actually NOT a passing 
zone; you may think you have enough room to pass a slower car 
and actually pull up alongside it, but then you and the 
slower vehicle will end up bumping each other and/or a 
barrier because of a fade.  

Turn 2 (Massanet): This is a sweeping left-hand blind corner 
requiring moderate braking on entry and light braking as you 
continue through the turn.  If you come in too fast, the 
corner workers will be scraping the right side of your car 
off the barrier at the end of the race; if you take the 
corner too tightly, the same will happen for the left side of 
the car.  The exit of Massanet is the highest point on the 
courseŠ which has only just begun, even if it IS all 
"downhill" from here!!!  

Turn 3 (Casino): Light or moderate braking will be needed for 
the right-hand Casino.  This corner almost immediately 
follows Massanet, and begins the long downward trajectory of 
the course.  This corner is actually wider than most, to the 
extent that a car in trouble may be parked along the barrier 
on the outside of the corner.  Be careful not to scrape the 
left-side barrier while exiting Turn 3.  

Turn 4 (Mirabeau): Following a long downhill straightaway, 
heavy braking is needed for this right-hand blind "J" turn.  
A small pull-off area is provided on the left on entry.  If 
you miss the braking zone, your front end will be crushed up 
against yet another barrier. This corner continues the 
course's downhill slope, which adds to the difficulty of the 
turn.  

Turn 5 (Great Curve): Following an extremely short 
straightaway, this left-hand hairpin is one of the slowest in 
all of F1 racing.  If you have excellent braking ability, you 
can actually PASS (a rarity!!!) by taking the tight inside 
line; otherwise, it would be best to drive through the Great 
Curve single-file.  

Turns 6 and 7 (Portier): This pair of right-hand corners form 
a "U" shape, but neither can be taken at any respectable 
speed.  Between these two corners on the left is a pull-off 
area, with another to the left on exiting the "U" formation.  
Turn 7 is the slowest of the two corners, and is the most 
difficult in terms of the view of the track.  Accelerating 
too soon out of Turn 7 means banging the left side of the car 
against yet another immovable barrier.  

Straightaway (The Tunnel): This "straightaway" is actually a 
very long right-hand fade in a semi-tunnel (the left side 
provides a clear view of the water).  However, even on a 
sunny day, visibility here is poor due to the sun being at a 
"wrong" angle compared to the circuit.  Start braking shortly 
after breaking back out into the sunlight (assuming Dry 
Weather is active), or you will break the front end of the 
car at the chicane.  

Chicane (Nouveau Chicane): This would not be so bad, except 
that F1 2000 puts both rumble strips AND a nasty barrier here 
to mark the chicane; some other F1 games (including the 
follow-up game to F1 2000) use only rumble strips here.  With 
the barrier here to impede your progress, braking is of 
utmost importance.  The course narrows as you come around the 
chicane, but then "widens" back to "normal" at the exit.  

Turn 8 (Tobacco): This left-hand corner is best taken with 
light braking, although it can be cleared with no braking 
with sufficient downforce, no traffic, and a FLAWLESS racing 
line.  

Turns 9-12 (Swimming Pool): This is essentially a double 
chicane around the swimming pool.  Turns 9 and 10 form a 
tight left-right combination, for which moderate braking is 
required.  After an extremely short straightaway, Turns 11 
and 12 form the opposite configuration (right-left), but are 
even tighter.  This opens out onto a short straightaway where 
you MIGHT be able to pass ONE car.  

Turns 13 and 14 (La Rascasse): This is a tight left-right 
chicane requiring moderate braking for Turn 13 and heavy 
braking for Turn 14.  Even worse, Turn 14 is a "J" turn, so 
the racing line is also very important here.  The Pit Lane is 
to the right at the exit of the chicane.  

Turns 15 and 16 (Anthony Hoges): A tight right-left chicane, 
these are the final corners of the Monaco circuit.  The 
course narrows here through the chicane, then "widens" to 
"normal" for the Pit Straight.  

Pit Entry: The entrance to the Pit Lane is to the right 
immediately after clearing La Rascasse.  Given that La 
Rascasse is a blind corner, on every lap, expect a slower car 
here headed for the pits.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF CANADA: CIRCUIT GILLES VILLENEUVE
This incredible circuit is built on an island, accessible to 
spectators only via subway.  Much of the course runs along 
the southern and northern shores of the island.  This course 
is also unusual in that the paddock area is again to the 
outside of the course, along the northern shore of the 
island.  The long, sweeping straightaways provide for 
excellent top-end speed - a much-welcome change from the 
slow, tight corners and the many unforgiving barriers of the 
streets of Monaco (the previous race circuit in Championship 
Mode) - but there are several tight corners here to challenge 
both drivers and cars.  Mind The Pin (Turn 10), the 
westernmost corner of the course.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: 0
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: This follows the final chicane of the circuit.  
As the Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the left, the 
Pit Straight fades to the right, setting up Turn 1.  

Turn 1: This left-hand corner will require moderate braking, 
and immediately flows into the Senna Curve.  There is a patch 
of extra pavement before entering Turn 1, but it is set too 
far back to be useful in attempting to gain a better racing 
line.  

Turn 2 (Senna Curve): This is a right-hand hairpin corner 
requiring heavy or severe braking.  It is very easy to run 
too wide here, slipping off into the grass.  Likewise, it is 
rather easy to overcompensate and cut the corner, which can 
result in a Stop-Go Penalty.  A moderate straightaway follows 
the Senna Curve, so acceleration from the exit is important.  

Turns 3 and 4: This right-left chicane can provide a good 
passing zone.  Turn 3 is tight and semi-blind, but passing on 
braking is an option for those who know the chicane well.  
Turn 4 is an easier corner, allowing good acceleration on 
exit, but it is still easy to overshoot the exit of the 
chicane and bang the right side of the car against the nearby 
barrier.  If you overshoot the entry to the chicane, you will 
be given a Stop-Go Penalty if you attempt to simply edge back 
onto the main course.  

Straightaway: At the end of this moderate straightaway, the 
course fades to the left, followed by Turn 5.  Light braking 
may be required at the fade if navigating traffic.  

Turn 5: This sweeping right-hand corner can be taken at full 
speed, unless you are coping with traffic.  Be careful not to 
hug the corner too tightly, or your right-side tires will be 
on the grass here.  

Turn 6: This left-hand corner will require moderate braking, 
or you will be flying through the grass toward the spectators 
in Grandstand 33.  Minor shortcutting of this corner is 
allowed by the CPU, which may be beneficial here for passing 
on braking.  This leads out to a very short straightaway.  

Turn 7: Following a very short straightaway, Turn 7 is a 
light-braking right-hand corner.  The outside of Turn 7 is a 
short, steep hillside with a barrier, so DO NOT run wide 
entering the corner!!!  It is easy to run wide on exit and 
slip off the course and into the barrier on the left, so be 
careful.  

Straightaway: The course runs along the southern shore of the 
island here.  Unfortunately, the extremely tall barrier 
prevents much of a viewŠ which actually forces your eyes to 
be transfixed on the road and other cars ahead.  Once you 
pass underneath the pedestrian bridge, begin braking for the 
next chicane.  

Turns 8 and 9: This right-left chicane is similar to Turns 6 
and 7 in that overrunning the chicane leaves you driving 
through the sand directly toward another grandstand full of 
spectators.  Moderate braking will be needed to safely enter 
the chicane's tight right-hand corner.  The second corner of 
the chicane is a gentler left-hand turn, but you might still 
run off the course to the right on exit and grind the right 
side of the car against the barrier, or roll up on the rumble 
strips on the inside of the corner and lose control of the 
car.  Accelerate strongly out of the chicane to set up 
passing possibilities along the following straightaway and 
into The Pin.  Nowhere on the course is there less CPU 
tolerance for shortcutting than in this chicane; if you 
overshoot the first corner, you can certainly expect to 
receive a Stop-Go Penalty.  

Straightaway: About two-thirds of the way along, the course 
fades to the left.  Begin braking early for Casino Hairpin 
unless you really want to slip through the sand trap; braking 
after passing underneath the second pedestrian bridge may be 
too late for this braking zone.  

Turn 10 (Casino Hairpin): This is a tight right-hand hairpin 
requiring heavy or even severe braking, depending on when you 
begin braking for the corner.  Somehow, this corner seems to 
be longer than it really is, so be judicious with the 
accelerator until you see clear, straight track ahead.  

Straightaway: On exiting Turn 10, the course fades to the 
right, then back to the left.  However, no braking is 
required here.  

Turn 11: Officially marked on course maps as a corner, the 
course actually only fades to the right here, thus no braking 
is required.  You should be fairly high up in the gearbox by 
the time you reach Turn 11.  

Straightaway (Casino Straight): The Casino Straight (named 
for the casino in the middle of the island) runs parallel to 
the northern shore of the island on which the course is 
built; there is not much of a view to the left, but it is not 
very interesting anyhow.  This is by far the longest 
straightaway of the entire course, so much of the time spent 
here will be in your car's top gear; a car with a low-
downforce set-up will perform quite well along the Casino 
Straight.  The Casino Straight leads to the final (right-
left) chicane of the course, as well as the entry for Pit 
Lane.  The Casino de Montreal is the grayish complex off the 
course to the right as you drive between the final two 
pedestrian bridges.  

Turns 12 and 13: This is a right-left chicane which can be 
cleared (without traffic) with light or moderate braking.  
With a high-downforce set-up, this chicane can be taken at 
full speed and no braking, but only by those with a flawless 
racing line and a perfect knowledge of the corners.  The exit 
of Turn 13 has a wide odd-colored Lane of concrete to allow 
for some swing-out, but be careful not to bump the barrier.  
The exit of the chicane flows onto the Pit Straight.  The Pit 
Lane entry runs straight ahead in line with the Casino 
Straight, so cars slowing on the left are likely heading in 
for servicing.  

Pit Entry: As you enter the final (right-left) chicane, the 
Pit Entry runs straight ahead.  Once clear of the main 
course, there is very little room for deceleration before the 
Pit Lane's own right-left chicane, so it is very important to 
slow down on Casino Straight before the Pit Entry.  Keep to 
the left when slowing on Casino Straight, allowing other cars 
to keep to the right as they prepare for the final chicane.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF FRANCE: NEVERS MAGNY-COURS
The Magny-Cours circuit is characterized by long, sweeping 
straightaways and fairly quick corners. The Adelaide hairpin 
will almost definitely cause trouble, especially for 
aggressive drivers, and rivals the Turn 1 (La Source) hairpin 
at Spa-Francorchamps as the slowest corner in all of F1 
racing.  This is a very fun course to drive (admittedly a 
very subjective statement), but its layout can produce 
problems from the standpoint of hearing other cars: Three of 
its straightaways are almost exactly parallel to each other, 
sometimes making it difficult to determine where other cars 
are truly located around you as you try to anticipate where 
the next group of traffic that you will need to navigate is 
located.  The circuit also has extremely wide areas along 
most of the main course to pull aside should your car have a 
major malfunction.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -1
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: Following the tight High School chicane, strong 
acceleration through the Pit Straight creates good passing 
chances through Great Curve and into Estoril.  However, the 
tightness of the High School chicane and the incredibly close 
proximity of the Pit Lane barrier requires immense caution as 
you come onto the Pit Straight.  The Start/Finish Line is 
about halfway down the Pit Straight; the Pit Lane rejoins the 
course from the left at this point.  

Turn 1 (Great Curve): In accordance with its name, this is a 
wide left-hand corner which can be taken flat-out.  

Turn 2 (Estoril): Depending on your set-up, either light or 
moderate braking will be needed for entering the VERY long 
right-hand 180-degree Estoril; in either case, you will 
almost certainly be tapping the brakes in Estoril.  It is 
quite easy to roll the right-side tires off onto the grass, 
and it is just as easy to slip off on the grass on the 
outside of Estoril.  

Straightaway (Golf): The Golf Straight if by far the longest 
of the course and includes several fades to the right.  

Turn 3 (Adelaide): The right-hand Adelaide hairpin is 
EXTREMELY tight.  The key here is to brake EARLY, as you will 
be downshifting from your top gear to your lowest gear 
rapidly; if you begin braking too late, you will be off in 
the grass.  If you accelerate too soon out of Adelaide, you 
will be rolling through the kitty litter and losing valuable 
track position.  

Straightaway: Acceleration out of Adelaide is important for 
passing other cars here.  There are a few fades in the course 
here.  

Turns 4 and 5 (Nurburgring): This is a right-left chicane 
which will require light braking.  If using a high-downforce 
set-up, it is possible to fly through Nurburgring without 
braking by making use of the bright-green extension on the 
inside of Turn 5.  However, if you remain on the bright-green 
extension for too long, you will be assigned a Stop-Go 
Penalty.  

Turn 6 (180 Degrees): This is quite true - the official name 
of this corner is "180 Degrees" according to the official Web 
site of Magny-Cours.  This is a wide left-hand hairpin 
nestled well within the Estoril hairpin.  Running too wide 
here will put you out in the sand; running too close to the 
apex could put you up on the rumble strips and force you to 
lose control.  

Straightaway: The third of the three parallel-running 
straightaways, this "straightaway" has several fades before 
the Imola chicane.  

Turns 7 and 8 (Imola): This right-left chicane should require 
light braking, except for cars with high-downforce set-ups 
and a flawless racing line.  A short straightaway out of 
Imola sets up the Water Castle curve.  There is not much CPU 
tolerance for running off the course here.  

Turn 9 (Water Castle): Somewhere between a "J" turn and a 
hairpin, this is an increasing-radius right-hand corner 
leading into the final straightaway of the circuit.  

Turns 10 and 11 (High School): There is a false line of 
pavement to the right as you near the official chicane; this 
false pavement runs directly up to an immovable barrier.  The 
official chicane requires light braking on entering, and 
allows for a VERY short burst of acceleration on exit.  There 
is yet another bright-green extension on the inside of Turn 
10, but taking this risks acquiring a Stop-Go Penalty.  If 
you completely miss this chicane, you will both accumulate a 
Stop-Go Penalty and blast through the sand trap and break the 
front end on a barrier blocking direct access to Pit Lane.  

Turn 12 (High School): On entry, the Pit Lane begins to the 
left.  The official corner is a tight right-hand turn which 
requires moderate or even heavy braking; wheel lock is very 
much a possibility here.  If you miss the corner, you will 
blast through the all-too-brief sand trap and ram directly 
against a barrier.  If you roll up on the inside of the 
corner, the angle of the rumble strips to the pavement will 
almost certainly cause your car to spin.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the left at the entry of 
Turn 12.  The Pit Lane has its own sharp corner almost 
immediately, so it is best to begin slowing (or rather, 
barely accelerating) as you leave the High School chicane.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF AUSTRIA: A1-RING
This course may only have seven corners, the fewest of the 
circuits used in the 2000 racing season, but it is still 
quite challenging for the drivers.  The course itself is 
built on a hillside, with the Paddock area and the Pit 
Straight located at the lowest elevation of the course.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -1
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

Pit Straight: Long and straight; main grandstands to the 
left, Pit Lane to the right.  Rather mundane, except that the 
entire Pit Straight has a slow uphill climb into the Castrol 
Curve.  

Turn 1 (Castrol Curve): After a rather mundane Pit Straight, 
the Castrol Curve is anything but mundane.  This is a right-
hand uphill corner which requires moderate braking.  The Pit 
Lane rejoins the main course on the right at the exit of the 
corner, but the Pit Lane barrier ends just before the 
entrance to Castrol Curve, meaning that if you really need to 
avoid an accident (or a large group of cars) on Castrol, you 
can suddenly jump over to the end of the Pit LaneŠ without a 
Stop-Go Penalty.  Because of the steep slope of the hill, it 
is all too easy to drive off the outside of the corner and 
into a sand trap.  

Straightaway: There are a few fades in the straightaway as 
the course continues its uphill climb.  The end of the 
straightaway (approaching Remus Curve) has a suddenly steeper 
grade.  

Turn 2 (Remus Curve): This is a TIGHT right-hand "J" turn 
requiring heavy or even severe braking.  The uphill climb of 
the course continues through most of the turn, making high or 
even moderate speeds impossible here.  Even worse, this is a 
blind corner due to the barrier.  Aggressive drivers will 
certainly end up overrunning the Remus Curve on exit and find 
themselves in the kitty litter.  

Straightaway: Located at the highest elevation of the course, 
this straightaway has a fade to the right, then another to 
the left.  After the second fade, prepare for braking before 
arriving at the Gosser Curve.  

Turn 3 (Gosser Curve): Another tight right-hand corner, 
moderate braking will be required here to avoid sliding off 
the course and into yet another sand trap.  This is also a 
blind corner, due to the barrier on the inside of Gosser.  
The course begins to slowly descend in elevation here.  

Straightaway: This is actually NOT a straightaway at all; the 
course map does not list the right-hand turn, but it is 
definitely more than just a fade.  Is you overrun this, you 
will end up in the same sand trap as before - it is simply 
extended along the left side of the course from the outside 
of Gosser until well beyond the unofficial corner.  

Turn 4 (Niki Lauda Curve): This is a wide left-hand corner 
which will require light or moderate braking; even if you 
slow greatly before entering the corner, you will likely be 
tapping the brakes as you progress through Niki Lauda.  There 
is another wide patch of sand on the outside of the corner, 
stretching almost all the way to the entrance of the Gerhard 
Berger Curve.  A short straightaway separates Turns 4 and 5.  

Turn 5 (Gerhard Berger Curve): This is almost identical to 
the Niki Lauda Curve, but with an additional sand trap which 
begins on the inside of the corner.  

Straightaway: Again more than a fade but not listed as an 
official corner, there is a "turn" to the right shortly after 
exiting the Gerhard Berger Curve.  About two-thirds of the 
way along, the course enters a forested area.  

Turn 6 (Jochen Rindt Curve): This is a semi-hidden right-hand 
corner which can be taken with light braking unless using a 
low-downforce set-up.  Another sand trap awaits those who run 
off the outside of the corner.  A short straightaway follows 
Jochen Rindt.  

Turn 7 (Mobilkom Curve): This is a right-hand corner which 
will require light or moderate braking.  The Pit Lane begins 
on the right just before the entry to Mobilkom, so be careful 
not to bump cars slowing before going to the pits.  The Pit 
Lane barrier does not begin until shortly after the exit of 
Mobilkom, and the CPU does not assign a Stop-Go Penalty for 
taking the Pit Lane and rejoining the course (slightly 
downhill) before reaching the barrier.  

Pit Entry: Located just before the entrance to the Mobilkom 
Curve, the Pit Lane is to the right.  This is a long pit 
lane, so plan to stay out of here as much as possible!!!  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF GERMANY: HOCKENHEIM
Surrounded by multitudes of trees, this is the fastest course 
used for F1 racing in 2000.  If not for the Jim Clark, Brems, 
and Ayrton Senna chicanes, cars would be flying around the 
course in top gear all the way from the North Curve (Turn 1) 
to the entry of the Stadium (Turn 10).  The three chicanes 
have paved shortcuts, but taking these will certainly amass a 
Stop-Go Penalty each time.  Except the right side of the Pit 
Straight, there is more than enough room to pull well off the 
pavement should a car have a serious problem.  

Special Note: To truly discover the speeds and the lap times 
once possible before the chicanes were added to Hockenheim, 
turn off the Flags option (if necessary) and purposely drive 
on the old course pavement through each of the chicanes.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: -2
Rear Downforce: +2
Gear Ratios: -1
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -3

Pit Straight: The entire left side of the Pit Straight has a 
rumble strip, the only course with this design.  This is an 
extremely short straightaway compared to the rest of the 
course.  

Turn 1 (North Curve): This right-hand corner can be taken 
with no or little braking.  The Pit Lane rejoins the course 
from the right at the exit of North Curve.  If you are not at 
full acceleration exiting this corner, you will definitely be 
passed in the long sweeping straightaway leading to the Jim 
Clark chicane.  

Straightaway: Immensely lengthy and lined with trees, speed 
is of the utmost importance here.  The entire straightaway is 
an extremely gentle fade to the right.  Drift to the left 
when you reach the grandstands.  

Turns 2 and 3 (Jim Clark Chicane): DO NOT keep driving 
straight ahead here; the mandatory chicane is a right-left 
pair of corners.  Moderate braking should be required for 
Turn 2, but full acceleration can be taken leading out of the 
chicane.  

Straightaway: Yet another long, sweeping straightaway which 
fades calmly to the right.  Again, drift to the left before 
entering the Brems Chicane.  

Turns 4 and 5 (Brems Chicane): The original course 
configuration (used in older F1 racing games) did not have a 
chicane here, and the original pavement remains.  However, 
the official course currently in use advances slightly from 
the old course, suddenly cuts tightly to the right and 
crosses the old pavement, then cuts tightly to the left to 
rejoin the old pavement.  Moderate braking will be needed for 
Turn 4, and light braking for Turn 5.  

Turn 6 (East Curve): This is a very wide right-hand corner 
which can be taken at top speed.  Strong acceleration out of 
Brems is important to assist in passing here.  

Straightaway: This is yet another long straightaway, but 
without any fades.  Drift to the right for the Ayrton Senna 
Chicane.  

Turns 7-9 (Ayrton Senna Chicane): DO NOT follow the old 
course pavement directly ahead unless you really WANT to 
serve a Stop-Go Penalty.  The official course turns to the 
left, cuts tightly to the right, and eases left again.  It is 
actually possible to speed into Turn 7 at top speed, then 
slam HARD on the brakes through Turn 8, and accelerate 
quickly out of the chicaneŠ but this is not recommended.  

Straightaway: The final long straightaway of the course has 
extra pavement on the left, "blocked" only by a line of 
orange cones.  Surprisingly, the CPU does not assign a Stop-
Go Penalty for driving to the left of these cones, so this 
could potentially be a place to pass large numbers of cars.  
This extra pavement begins shortly after the exit of the 
Ayrton Senna chicane, and ends at the entry of the Stadium; 
thus, if you are on this "extra" pavement entering the 
Stadium, you will have a better racing line for Turn 10, 
allowing you to clearly navigate the corner without braking.  

Turn 10 (Entrance to the Stadium: Agip Curve): Light braking 
may be required here, but you should be able to pass through 
the Agip Curve without any braking at all (especially if your 
racing line began with the "extra" pavement on the left 
before the Stadium).  A short straightaway follows.  

Turn 11 (Continuing through the Stadium: Sachscurve): This is 
a left-hand wide hairpin turn.  Be careful not to overrun the 
corner and end up in the grass, either entering or exiting 
the corner.  

Straightaway (Continuing through the Stadium): This short 
straightaway has a fade to the left, followed by a fade to 
the right.  

Turns 12 and 13 (Exiting the Stadium: Opel): This first 
right-hand corner is somewhat tight, and moderate braking 
will be required here; the old course rejoins the current 
course from the left on exit, so if you run wide in this 
corner, you can recover here.  The final corner of the 
circuit is a right-hand corner which will require light 
braking.  The Pit Lane entry is to the right just before the 
official Turn 13.  Unless you are headed for the pits, you 
should be able to accelerate out of the Stadium here and stay 
on the accelerator all the way to the Jim Clark chicaneŠ 
which is quite a long time!!!!!  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right at the entry of 
Turn 13 (the final corner of the Stadium).  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF HUNGARY: HUNGARORING
The Hungaroring circuit has wide run-off areas, which can be 
quite important, especially for Turn 1.  It is imperative to 
qualify near the top of the grid and be (one of) the first 
through this corner, as traffic backs up tremendously here at 
the start of a race.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

Pit Straight: This is the highest point on the course and a 
very long straightaway.  Actually, the highest point is at 
the very end of the Pit Straight, at the entrance of Turn 1.  

Turn 1: It's all downhill from hereŠ almost literally.  This 
right-hand hairpin corner is downhill all the way through, 
making early braking a necessity; plus, you will certainly be 
tapping the brakes all the way through this important first 
turn.  If you do overrun the corner, there is a huge sand 
trap for your inconvenience.  However, if you roll up on the 
inside rumble strips, expect your car to spin violently. 

Turns 2 and 3: After a short straightaway, Turn 2 is a left-
hand "J" turn requiring light braking; do not keep going 
straight ahead and miss the official corner, as that patch of 
pavement ends in an immovable barrier.  It is quickly 
followed by Turn 3, a right-hand corner which must be taken 
at full throttle to set up passing opportunities through Turn 
3 and along the ensuing straightaway.  

Turn 4: This moderate left-hand corner may require light 
braking or can be taken flat-out, depending on the downforce 
set-up of the car.  Plenty of kitty litter awaits those who 
overrun the corner.  

Turn 5: Moderate braking is necessary for this right-hand "J" 
turn.  Plenty of sand is available on both sides of the 
pavement here, just in case.  

Turns 6 and 7: The CPU is very touchy about this right-left 
chicane; virtually ANY short-cutting here results in a Stop-
Go Penalty.  There is plenty of sand here as well, just in 
case.  Turn 6 is tight, requiring heavy braking.  Turn 7 
requires light braking, and beware the barrier on the right 
on exit if you happen to swing out too wide.  

Turn 8: This moderate left-hand corner may require light 
braking, but may also be taken at full speed if using 
sufficient downforce.  

Turn 9: Almost immediately following Turn 8, this right-hand 
corner definitely requires moderate braking to keep to the 
pavement.  Accelerate strongly out of Turn 9 to set up 
passing opportunities.  

Turn 10: An easy left-hand corner which can be taken at top 
speed.  This is a prime place to pass if sufficient 
acceleration was made out of Turn 9.  

Turn 11: Shortly following Turn 10, the right-hand Turn 11 
requires moderate braking to stay out of the kitty litter.  

Turns 12 and 13: This is a right-left chicane for which the 
CPU is again very touchy concerning shortcutting.  While 
slowing for the corner here is officially preferable, it is 
possible with any downforce set-up to speed through at full 
throttle by making use of the rumble strips; of course, this 
is virtually impossible to do safely if racing in wet 
conditions.  

Turn 14: This is a wide "J" turn to the left.  At first, 
there is plenty of sand to the outside for those who overrun 
the corner, but then a metal barrier rubs up against the 
pavement beginning about halfway around the corner, so DO NOT 
overrun the corner if you like having the right side of the 
car intact.  The course begins its uphill trajectory here.  A 
very short straightaway follows.  

Turn 15: At the entry of this final corner is the Pit Lane 
entry on the left, so beware of slower cars on the right.  
The official corner itself is an uphill, right-hand hairpin 
with little room for those who overrun the corner.  
Accelerate strongly out of this final corner to pass along 
the Pit Straight and put on a show for the spectators.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins at the entry of Turn 15 on the 
right; begin slowing (or do not accelerate much) at the end 
of Turn 14.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF BELGIUM: SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS
This is a well-storied course used for many forms of racing.  
One of the longer courses used in the 2000 F1 season, the 
forest setting is rather scenic.  This is also home to the 
famous Turn 1 - the La Source hairpin - which is the slowest 
corner in all of F1 racing.  As at Hungaroring, it is very 
important to be at the front of the grid on the first lap to 
safely navigate the first turn.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: 0 

NOTE: A negative setting on Ground Clearance will increase 
overall speed, but will definitely mean bottoming out along 
the steep uphill fades through Eau Rouge.  

Pit Straight: Strong acceleration out of the Bus Stop chicane 
allows SOME room for passing here, but only experts would 
ever consider waiting until after crossing the Start/Finish 
Line to brake for La Source, because the Line is so far down 
the Pit Straight.  The course also slopes downward here, all 
the way through La Source.  

Turn 1 (La Source): This is an incredibly tight right-hand 
hairpin.  Fortunately, there is plenty of swing-out room and 
plenty of recovery space, both paved. The downward slope of 
the course is not much, but it does add to the difficulty of 
this hairpin turn.  Brake lock-up and the resultant flat-
spotting of the tires is quite easy to inadvertently 
accomplish here, especially in wet racing conditions, so 
caution is extremely important.  If a car in front of you 
takes the wrong racing line, passing here can be easy.  
Passing can also occur here if you brake REALLY late (after 
crossing the Start/Finish Line) AND have a high-downforce 
set-up to allow for tighter cornering. 

Straightaway: Immediately at the exit of La Source is where 
the Pit Lane rejoins the main course, so try to keep away 
from the inside of the course here.  To the right is the Pit 
Lane for the 24-hour races held at Spa-Francorchamps; take 
care not to smash into this Pit Lane concrete barrier.  
Immediately after passing the "other" Pit Lane and entering 
Eau Rouge (Red Water), the straightaway has several fades 
during a semi-blind steep uphill climb into Turn 2.  It is 
all too easy to misjudge the racing line and wind up out in 
the sand and the grass on either side of the pavement here.  

Turn 2 (Eau Rouge): This is an easy right-hand corner at the 
top of the steep uphill climb.  The kitty litter on either 
side of the course fades away shortly after the corner.  

Straightaway (Kemmel): The course truly enters the forested 
area here, with trees lining both sides of the course.  Cars 
can easily achieve speeds well over 180MPH and even 
surpassing 200MPH (depending on downforce set-up) by the end 
of this straightaway.  

Turns 3-5 (Malmedy): This is a right-left-right combination 
of corners.  Moderate or even heavy braking is necessary 
entering Malmedy (Turn 3), but little or no braking is needed 
for Turn 4.  After an almost non-existent straightaway, light 
braking is needed for Turn 5.  The Malmedy complex has plenty 
of run-off room, both sand and grass.  

Straightaway: Between Malmedy and Bruxelles (the French 
spelling of "Brussels," the capital of Belgium), the course 
takes a steep downward trajectory.  This can be a good 
passing zone for those who did not need to use the brakes 
leaving the Malmedy complex.  

Turn 6 (Bruxelles): The course continues downhill all the way 
through this right-hand hairpin, making heavy braking a 
necessity before the corner as well as light braking most of 
the way through Bruxelles.  If any corner is to be overrun on 
a regular basis during the course of a race, this is it, so 
the wide sandy recovery area may actually be a blessing in 
disguise.  However, due to the slope of the hill, running up 
on the rumble strips on the inside of the turn may well 
result in a spin.  

Turn 7: Shortly following Bruxelles, this left-hand corner 
requires light or moderate braking.  

Turn 8 and 9 (Pouhon): These two easy left-hand corners 
essentially form a wide "U" shape.  Unless traffic blocks the 
main racing line, top speed can be carried from Turn 7 all 
the way through Pouhon.  There is plenty of run-off room 
here, if needed.  

Turns 10 and 11 (Fagnes): This right-left complex will 
require light braking on entry, and possibly tapping the 
brakes through Turn 11 as well.  Accelerate well out of 
fagnes to pass one or two cars on the short straightaway 
which follows.  

Turn 12 (Stavelot): This is another right-hand corner, 
requiring light or moderate braking.  It is highly important 
to accelerate STRONG out of Stavelot, as you won't be even 
tapping the brakes until the Bus Stop.  

Turn 13 (Blanchimont): This is a long, sweeping, left-hand 
corner which must be carried at top speed (from Stavelot) or 
else you WILL be passed by others.  The trees here are 
pretty, but keep your eyes on the road!!!!!

Turns 14-17 (Bus Stop Chicane): This is a tight left-right 
followed by a short straight and a tight right-left.  The 
beginning of the chicane is at the top of a small rise, so 
the first two turns are blocked from view on approach unless 
other cars are there to mark the course for you.  Moderate 
braking should be used for both parts of the Bus Stop, but 
experts can semi-easily fly through the Bus Stop at top 
speed.  The CPU has little tolerance for shortcutting here.  

Pit Entry: While the Bus Stop begins here with a tight left-
hand corner, the Pit Lane continues straight ahead, with a 
quick right-left mini-chicane of its own.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF ITALY: MONZA
This historic high-speed track hosts a highly partial pro-
Ferrari crowd.  Unfortunately, F1 2000 uses the "old" course 
configuration; for the 2000 incarnation of the Italian Grand 
Prix, the initial tight left-right-left-right chicanes used 
in previous races were removed and replaced instead with a 
gentler right-left-right chicane similar to Hokkenheim's Jim 
Clark Chicane, but slightly tighter in overall configuration.  
The 2000 Italian Grand Prix is the race in which a volunteer 
corner worker was killed at the Roggia chicane, due to all 
the flying debris from the first-lap multi-car collision 
caused by a driver missing his braking zone.  This is the 
final race of the "European" season; the final three races 
are all overseas, "flyaway" races.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: -1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: Strong acceleration out of the Parabolica can 
create prime passing opportunities alone the Pit Straight.  
The Pit Lane begins on the right shortly after exiting the 
Parabolica.  All along the Pit Straight, take care not to rub 
the right-side tires against the barriers, which are 
practically flush up against the pavement.  

Turns 1-4 (Rettifilio): These are the aforementioned "old" 
chicanes.  This is a pair of consecutive tight left-right 
corners.  The CPU does allow for some shortcutting here, but 
not much.  The inside of each of these four corners has a 
straight line diagonal to the pavement where the different 
types of grass join together; cross this line by a single 
pixel and you will be serving a Stop-Go Penalty shortly.  

Turn 5 (Biassono): This sweeping right-hand corner among the 
thick trees can be taken flat-out.  To the left is a long, 
wide area of sand, but the corner is so extremely gentle that 
the sand should not be needed for any reason unless you blow 
an engine.  

Turns 6 and 7 (Roggia): This chicane is extremely difficult 
to see on approach unless traffic is present to mark the 
pavement for you, so it is very easy to overrun the chicane.  
This is a very tight left-right chicane which even experts 
will rarely be able to handle at full speed; moderate braking 
is required by drivers of all levels of experience.  The CPU 
has NO tolerance for shortcutting Roggia, so don't even try 
it!!!!!  There is a large sand trap for those who miss the 
chicane altogether.  

Turn 8 (First Lesmo): This right-hand corner requires light 
or moderate braking.  There is a wide sand trap on the 
outside of the corner.  

Turn 9 (Second Lesmo): This right-hand corner is a little 
tighter than the First Lesmo, and also has a significant area 
of kitty litter on the outside of the corner.  Moderate 
braking will be needed here.  

Turn 10 (Serraglio): This is really just a fade to the left, 
but the official course map lists this as a curve.  Counting 
this as a fade, this marks about the halfway point on the 
longest straightaway of the Monza circuit.  There is 
sufficient room to pull off the course here on either side if 
necessary, except when passing underneath the bridge.  

Turns 11-13 (Ascari): The Ascari chicane is more difficult 
than it seems.  Turn 11 is a left-hand corner requiring at 
least light braking.  This is followed immediately by a 
right-hand corner requiring moderate braking.  Turn 13 can be 
taken at full acceleration if you slowed enough in Turn 12.  
Wide areas of grass and sand are available for those 
overruninng any part of the chicane, but those drivers will 
also be given a Stop-Go Penalty.  Unfortunately, F1 2000 does 
not provide the real course's paved swing-out area on the 
exit of Ascari.  

Straightaway (Rettilineo Parabolica): This is a significant 
straightaway and a prime passing zone, especially with 
powerful acceleration out of Ascari.  

Turn 14 (Curva Parabolica): This final corner is a wide 
increasing-radius right-hand "hairpin."  Light or moderate 
braking is required on entry, but once about one-third of the 
way around the "hairpin," stand on the accelerator all the 
way through to the Rettifilio.  The outside of the Curva 
Parabolica has an immense expanse of kitty litter, but this 
should not be necessary.  

Pit Entry: Shortly after exiting the Curva Parabolica, the 
Pit Lane begins on the right.  This is perhaps the shortest 
Pit Lane in all of F1; there is virtually NO room for 
deceleration once leaving the main course, so cars going in 
for servicing will begin slowing at the exit of the Curva 
Parabolica.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF THE UNITED STATES: INDIANAPOLIS
The inaugural U.S. Grand Prix was significant for three 
reasons.  First, for the first time ever, cars were racing 
"backward" (clockwise) at Indianapolis.  Second, cars were 
racing in the rain, which is unheard-of in American auto 
racing.  Third, FIA allowed Fox Sports Net, the American 
cable network which provided the world feed coverage of the 
race, to introduce the side-view of a driver (Michael 
Shumacher) at work.  Fortunately, except the Pit Straight, 
the course features wide run-off areas, especially along 
Hulman Blvd.  For the drivers, part of the "mystique" of the 
U.S. Grand Prix at Indianapolis was the closeness of the 
spectators; at no other F1 circuit are the fans literally 
"just across the wall" from the cars.  The U.S. Grand Prix 
begins the final "flyaway" (non-European) races of the 2000 
season.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +2
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

NOTE ON SET-UP: All weekend long, teams were struggling with 
one major decision: to use a low-downforce set-up or a high-
downforce set-up.  The infield of the course has so many 
corners (and really only one straightaway of any mention) 
that it necessitated a high-downforce set-up for optimum 
speed and handling; the main Indy course requires drivers to 
stand on the throttle for nearly thirty seconds, thus 
requiring a low-downforce set-up to take maximum advantage of 
this extensive prime passing zone.  The suggested set-up 
presented here is for a high-downforce set-up, to take 
advantage of the infield segment of the course.  For those 
racing in Easy or Medium modes, you might still get passed on 
the main Indy course, but it is easy to block challengers 
from getting by.  For those in higher racing modes, this may 
not be a good set-up to use.  Experiment and find the set-up 
which works best for you - at Indy especially, but also at 
any other F1 course.  

Pit Straight: This is the same as the Pit Straight used for 
the Indy and NASCAR races here, but the cars drive in the 
"wrong" direction.  Expect top speeds close to or even 
exceeding 200MPH for those cars using a low-downforce set-up; 
cars with a high-downforce set-up will likely hold a top 
speed of only 160-170MPH.  

Turns 1 and 2: After about 28 seconds at full throttle, this 
tight right-left combination can be deadly if you miss the 
braking zone.  Brake early and hard to safely navigate Turn 1 
in first or second gear, then accelerate through Turn 2.  

Turn 3: This is a sweeping right-hand corner which can be 
taken at top speed.

Turn 4: This is a long right-hand "J" turn requiring moderate 
braking to keep to the pavement.  

Turn 5: Another right-hand corner, this corner requires light 
or moderate braking, and can be a good passing zone with good 
braking on entry.  

Turn 6: This left-hand hairpin requires good braking 
throughout.  Accelerating too soon will certainly put you out 
on the grass.

Turn 7: This is a right-hand "J" turn onto Human Blvd.  
Moderate braking is need here, but there is fortunately a 
wide paved swing-out area on exit.  

Straightaway (Hulman Blvd.): This is the longest straightaway 
of the infield course, so strong acceleration is key here.  
Cars with a low-downforce set-up will greatly benefit here, 
especially with a low gear ratio).  

Turn 8: Turning a little to the right, this corner requires 
light or moderate braking, depending on car set-up and top 
speed on Hulman Blvd.  However, the following straightaway is 
extremely short, so do not expect to accelerate much before 
"Mickey" and "Mouse."

Turn 9 ("Mickey"): This is a tight right-hand "J" turn, 
nicknamed "Mickey" by the sportscasters at the inaugural F1 
race at Indianapolis.  This is a second-gear corner at best, 
but likely first gear is a better choice here.  

Turn 10 ("Mouse"): This tight left-hand hairpin corner was 
nicknamed "Mouse" by sportscasters.  Any speed above 45MPH 
will certainly force you off the course and into the grass.  
A strong, short burst of acceleration out of "Mouse" can set 
up a good passing opportunity in Turn 11.  

Turn 11: This long right-hand corner is the final corner of 
the course requiring braking.  It is still fairly easy to 
slip off the course, so be careful here.  From here all the 
way to the end of the Pit Straight, you should be fully on 
the accelerator, for approximately 28 seconds before braking 
for the first corner.  

Turn 12: This right-hand corner brings the cars back out onto 
the oval used for Indy and NASCAR races, and coming back out 
onto the banking may be a little challenging at first.  No 
braking is required here.  

Turn 13: This is the banked "Turn 1" of the Indy and NASCAR 
races here, taken in reverse.  It is important to hug the 
apex of the corner tightly, but to keep off the infield 
grass.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins just before Turn 13, but in F1 
2000, the Pit Lane barrier doesn't begin until the exit of 
Turn 13.  This means that 1.) you can enter the Pit Lane 
"late," or 2.) you can use the beginning of the Pit Lane to 
pass slower cars on the main course, then cut back out to the 
Pit Straight just before the barrier; in either case, you are 
likely to cross the grass, although there is a short paved 
area just before the Pit Lane barrier.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF JAPAN: SUZUKA
This famous figure-eight circuit is used for many forms of 
auto and motorcycle racing.  One of the most famous sights of 
the "circuit" is the large Ferris Wheel on the left behind 
the spectator stands as cars pass along the Pit Straight.  
The Grand Prix of Japan is usually the last race of the F1 
season, but was pushed back by one race for the 2000 season; 
it will once again be the final race of the season beginning 
in 2001.  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -1

Pit Straight: Good speeds can be achieved here with strong 
acceleration out of the chicane.  The Pit Lane rejoins the 
course from the right near the end of the Pit Straight.  

Turn 1: This right-hand hairpin requires moderate braking on 
approach, and you will likely be tapping the brakes through 
the hairpin itself.  This begins an uphill climb, and it is 
difficult to see the left side of the pavement on exit, so be 
careful not to run too wide and end up out in the sand.  
There is really no reason to overrun the hairpin on entry, as 
the corner is quite easily identifiable.  

Turns 2-5 (S Curves): This is the hardest section of the 
course - tight left-right-left-right corners.  The first of 
the "S" curves can likely be taken at full speed, with light 
or moderate braking for Turn 3.  Turn 4 can be taken either 
flat-out (not suggested) or with light braking.  No matter 
what, slam on the brakes for Turn 5, the tightest corner of 
the "S" section.  This entire segment of the course continues 
the uphill climb, making Turn 5 a little more difficult.  
There is ample recovery room on either side of the course 
through the uphill "S" section.  The "S" section is a good 
place to pass slower cars, if you have enough confidence in 
your brakes to pass during corner entry.  No matter what, you 
will NOT be surviving the "S" curves unless you use the 
brakes generously.  

Turn 6 (Dunlop Curve): This sweeping left-hand corner is the 
crest of the initial uphill segment of the course, and can be 
taken at full acceleration.  

Turn 7 (Degner): Here, the course turns to the right in 
anticipation of the figure-eight pattern.  Light braking will 
likely be required, but cars with sufficient high-downforce 
set-ups can speed through here without braking.  To the 
outside of the course is a wide expanse of grass and sand in 
case you overrun the corner.  

Turn 8 (Degner): The final right-hand corner before passing 
underneath the bridge, this turn is tighter than the previous 
corner, thus moderate braking and a steady racing line will 
be required here.  This is also another prime passing zone.  

Straightaway: Accelerate strongly out of Degner and you 
should be able to pass one or two cars as you drive 
underneath the bridge.  The course fades to the right here 
before reaching the tight hairpin.  

Turn 9 (Hairpin): This is a tight left-hand hairpin which 
begins the next uphill segment of the Suzuka circuit.  It is 
possible to shortcut a little here, but the grass combined 
with the angle of the hill here will really slow you down.  
Be careful not to accelerate too soon, or you will be out in 
the grass.  There is a sizeable patch of kitty litter for 
those who miss the hairpin completely.  

Turn 10: Continuing the uphill run, the course here makes a 
wide sweep to the right.  Braking here means losing track 
positions.  

Turns 11 and 12 (Spoon): This is a tricky pair of left-hand 
corners, in a decreasing-radius "U" formation.  The first 
corner is fairly standard, requiring little (if any) braking.  
However, Turn 12 is both tighter AND slopes downhill, so 
judicious usage of brakes and a pristine racing line are both 
important here, especially if attempting to pass a slower 
vehicle.  If you misjudge any single corner at Suzuka, it 
will be Turn 12; fortunately, there is plenty of recovery 
room on both sides of the pavement here.  However, do not 
roll up on the rumble strips or the grass on the inside of 
Turn 12, as that will almost certainly cause you to lose 
control and likely spin.  

Straightaway: Power out of Spoon and fly along the 
straightaway, passing multiple cars, especially if you have a 
low-downforce set-up.  After you cross the bridge, start 
thinking about the chicane.  

Turn 13 (130R): Shortly after crossing the bridge, the course 
turns gently to the left.  No braking is required here, but 
look for cars slowing for the Pit Lane entry just before the 
chicane.  

Turns 14-16 (Chicane): This is a very tricky part of the 
course.  The chicane begins with a moderate turn to the 
right, then a tight left-hand corner, then ends with a wider 
turn to the right and out onto the Pit Straight.  
Fortunately, the inside of the chicane is filled with sand 
and not barriers, but cutting the chicane results in a Stop-
Go Penalty.  Be careful coming out of Turn 15 that you don't 
go too wide and bump the right-front tire on the Pit Lane 
barrier.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right just before 
Chicane.  Note that the Pit Entry is the SECOND patch of 
pavement to the right coming off the main course.  

==============================================

GRAND PRIX OF MALAYSIA: SEPANG
This is the second-newest F1 course in use, its construction 
completed in time for the end of the 1999 F1 season.  Sepang 
includes very wide recovery zones all along the course, on 
both sides of the pavement, with very few exceptions.  The 
main grandstands are nestled within the course itself, as the 
"back straight" and the "Pit Straight" flank each side of the 
main spectator seats, linked by a tight left-hand hairpin.  
While the pavement is rather wide for an F1 circuit, it is 
actually more difficult to drive than it appears on 
television, especially the "back" part of the course (behind 
the main grandstands).  

Set-up:
Front Downforce: +1
Rear Downforce: +3
Gear Ratios: -3
Steering Lock: +3
Front Suspension: +2
Rear Suspension: +2
Brake Balance: -1
Ground Clearance: -2

Pit Straight: The main grandstands are to the left as you fly 
down the Pit Straight.  There is a short bit of sand or grass 
to the right between the main course and the Pit Lane 
barrier, about enough room for a car to pull off.  Slam on 
the brakes at the end of the Pit Straight, as the first two 
corners are VERY tight.  

Turns 1 and 2: Turn 1 is a TIGHT right-hand corner, followed 
immediately by a not-as-tight-but-still-difficult left-hand 
Turn 2.  If there is traffic ahead of you, the cars will 
certainly bunch up here.  The first corner on the opening lap 
of any F1 race is characterized by cars bunching up together; 
given the downhill slope of Turns 1 (beginning at the exit) 
and 2, cars are even more likely than usual to bump each 
other and/or the barrier here.  Fortunately, the outside of 
Turn 2 has a wide (sand-filled) recovery area, so if a major 
accident takes place, it might be wise to (carefully) take to 
the sand to avoid the worst of the chaos and debris.   

Turn 3: Accelerate hard through this sweeping right-hand 
corner.  No braking is necessary here.  The course begins a 
gentle uphill climb here.  

Turn 4: It is easy to overrun this corner, either on entry or 
on exit, but the wide patch of sand is available to slow you 
down in these situations.  This right-hand corner is the 
crest of the uphill climb which began in Turn 3.  Moderate 
braking will be required here.  

Turns 5 and 6: Turn 5 is an easy left-hand corner, followed 
by the similarly-shaped right-hand Turn 6.  In Turn 5, the 
barrier comes very close to the pavement on the inside of the 
corner, so be careful not to roll up on the grass here.  
There is plenty of space for recovery on the outside of each 
corner, which may be important exiting Turn 6 as it is rather 
easy to run too wide on exit.  Both corners can be taken 
either flat-out or with simply a light tapping of the brakes.  

Turns 7 and 8:  These two right-hand corners are best taken 
in a wide "U" formation.  It is possible to fly through these 
corners at top speed, but some may feel more comfortable by 
tapping the brakes very briefly at about the apex of each 
corner.  There is plenty of kitty litter on the outside of 
the corners here is you lose concentration and drive off the 
pavement.  

Turn 9: This tight left-hand corner is made even more 
difficult by the brief uphill slope leading to the corner 
itself, which hides the view of the pavement as the course 
turns to the left here.  Early braking is key, or else you 
WILL be caught out in the sand trap.  Moderate or heavy 
braking will be needed here, depending on your top speed 
coming out of the "U" formation of Turns 7 and 8.  If you 
have excellent confidence in your braking ability (especially 
with fresh tires after a pit stop), this is a great place to 
pass other cars on braking, but only if attempted near the 
inside of the corner.  

Turn 10: After the tightness of Turn 9, Turn 10's right-hand 
corner can be taken at full throttle.  The course climbs 
gently uphill here, cresting shortly after the exit.  

Turn 11: The course begins a gentle downhill slope near the 
entry of Turn 11, then turns to the right as the downhill 
slope continues.  Light or moderate braking will be needed 
here.  This is also a good place to pass other cars on 
braking.  It is also easy to overrun the corner, so there is 
plenty of sand to the outside of the corner to slow you down 
in this instance.  

Turn 12: After a short straightaway, the course turns to the 
left.  If you hug the apex tightly, you should be able to 
take Turn 12 without braking.  Again, plenty of sand awaits 
those who slide off the pavement here.  

Turn 13: This is a right-hand decreasing-radius hairpin with 
no paved swing-out area on exit, making the corner more 
difficult than it at first appears.  The first 90 degrees can 
be taken at top speed, although some braking is greatly 
recommended here.  After that, moderate or heavy braking is 
required to keep from rolling out into the kitty litter.  
Strong acceleration is key on exit.  

Straightaway: This straightaway runs along the "back side" of 
the main grandstands.  This is a very long straightaway, so 
powerful acceleration out of the Turn 13 hairpin can provide 
good passing opportunities here, especially for those using a 
low-downforce set-up.  Near the end of the straightaway, a 
line of pavement leaves to the right, but this is NOT the Pit 
Lane entry used for F1 races.  

Turn 14: This is the final corner of the course, and perhaps 
the most important in a close race.  Following the long 
straightaway both the "back side" of the main grandstands, 
this is a left-hand hairpin, much tighter than Turn 13.  It 
is key here to approach from the right, tightly hug the apex, 
and accelerate strongly to the right on exit.  The Pit Lane 
entry begins here halfway through the hairpin, so beware of 
slower cars going in for servicing.  This is also a good 
place to pass on braking, especially for those with a high-
downforce set-up.  

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins halfway through the Turn 14 
hairpin (the final corner of the course).  Keep to the right 
entering the hairpin, to allow those passing you to dive to 
the left-hand apex of the corner; after the first 90 degrees 
of the corner, drive straight ahead along the Pit Lane.  
However, you will quickly find the Pit Lane curving to the 
left, so make sure you have slowed enough to not bang the 
front wing or front-right tire against the barrier.  

==============================================
==============================================

WRAP-UP
Hopefully, this driving guide will be/has been of some use to 
you.  Fortunately, the follow-up game, F1 Championship Season 
2000, is almost identical to F1 2000, so the information in 
this driving guide can largely also apply to the newer game.  
In fact, if possible, I suggest upgrading to the more recent 
game, which features a better physics engine (which makes 
Monaco a little easier to survive), more realistic opponent 
behavior (truly challenging for us aggressive drivers), more 
racing modes (including an interactive training/analysis mode 
for each of the seventeen courses used in the 2000 F1 racing 
season), and more potential car problems (brake damage, 
suspension failure, transmission problems, etc.).  In short, 
F1 Championship Season 2000 is more realistic than F1 2000.  

The official FIA Web site (http://www.fia.com/) has a lot of 
good information for F1 racing, including the current 
season's race schedule and links to the official Web sites of 
most of the courses used.  The FIA Web site is available in 
both French and English.  

==============================================

CONTACT INFORMATION
For questions, rants, raves, permissions, etc., including the 
latest version of this driving guide, please contact me at: 
FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM

==============================================



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