NHL 2K

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Strategy Guide


                              TABLE OF CONTENTS
                               -INTRODUCTION
                               -CONTROLS
                               -RULES
                               -PENALTIES
                               -OFFENSE
                               -DEFENSE
                               -COACHING 
                               -TEAMS
     

INTRODUCTION

A languid zamboni traces a glassy arch on dusted ice. The crowd is fidgeting, 
buzzing, losing its collective mind. No one has left for the concession stand for 
fear they'll miss the upcoming action. It's double overtime, game seven of the 
Stanley Cup. Somehow, you've taken your Nashville Predators from virtual obscurity 
to the cusp of ultimate hockey greatness. Sweat stands beaded on your forehead. Your 
hands ache, your heart threatens to beat itself out of your body. You've come to 
play. You've come to win. 

Pull on your sweater and let's head to the pond. Hockey has landed on the Dreamcast, 
thanks to Blackbox and Sega Sports, in a fast and entertaining interpretation of 
the "fastest game on ice." 

Want to get to the Stanley Cup? You'll need every drop of finesse, every ounce of 
strength, every last nerve, and a few lucky deflections to get there. This guide is 
designed to help you in your quest. Whether you're a newcomer to hockey, and need to 
learn the rules, or a veteran video skater who wants some tips on schooling your 
buddies, step right up. Something for everyone. 


CONTROLS 

Most of the controls of NHL2K are simple and easy to learn.  However, certain 
maneuvers, especially backhand shots and shot aim, can be difficult to master.  Find 
the full control list below: 



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Offense 

Skating: Analog stick 
Use the analog stick to move your player across the ice. 

Passing: A 
Press A and use the analog stick to pass to the desired player. 

Dump: Y 
Dump the puck into the corner.  Use the analog stick to aim. 

Speed burst: B 
Gives your player a temporary energy boost.  Too much use of this button will tire 
players quickly. 

Shooting: 
Wrist shot: tap X button 
Tap the shoot button to flick a quick shot toward the goal.  Aim using the analog 
stick. 

Slap shot: hold X button 
Hold the X button to cock back your stick and produce a powerful slap shot.  The 
longer you hold the button, the harder your shot.  Use this shot in the open, or 
you’ll be robbed of the puck during your wind-up. 

One-timer: before pass reaches you, tap or hold X button 
Hit the A button to pass to an open player, then before the puck reaches him, hit 
the shot button.  Tapping X will produce a one-timed wrist shot, holding it will 
give you a one-timed slap shot. 

Backhand shot: tap X button when player’s stick is facing backhand to the goal 
When the curved side of your stick is facing the goal (opposite of the player’s 
shooting hand), tap the X button to execute a backhand shot.  If you hold the button 
too long, you’ll swing around to attempt a forehand slap shot. 

A note on shot aim: 
Shot aim is one of the trickier controls to master in NHL2K.  By simultaneously 
pressing the analog stick to a specific direction, and hitting the shoot button, you 
can place a shot to make it more difficult to defend.  Take a look at the goal the 
instant before you shoot.  If there is room in the upper-right corner of the net, 
for instance, aim for that. The best way to do this is get used to quickly tapping 
both the direction you want to shoot (in this case up and to the right), while 
tapping the shoot button.  Slap shots allow for a bit more aim, as you can select 
your shot direction during the wind-up.  If you are new to hockey games, shot aim 
can take some time to master, and this particular game is touchy.  Play several 
exhibition games against some of the weaker teams to get a feel for this feature. 

Touch pass: just as pass hits your stick, hit A to redirect the puck 
Although the touch pass is not an official control, you can approximate one with a 
quick button finger.  Just as a pass reaches your stick, hit the pass button 
immediately to simulate a touch pass. 

L Trigger: 
Press the L Trigger to change the coaching strategy. 

R Trigger: 
Press the R Trigger to change lines. 



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Defense 

Skating: Analog stick 
Same as above. 

Change players: A 
Hit the A button to select the player closest to the puck.  Push the analog stick in 
the direction of another player and hit A to select someone else. 

Poke check: tap X button 
Tap the X button to make your defender poke his stick at a controlled puck.  Holding 
this button too long will cause your player to hook, and may result in a penalty. 

Body check/Speed burst: B 
When you don’t have the puck, press B to lay the smack down on an opposing player.  
When moving in neutral ice without the puck, press B to speed up.  Repeated pressing 
of the button will result in fatigue. 

Clear: with puck hit Y 
Press Y to clear the puck out of dangerous situations. 

Block: without puck hit Y 
If you do not have the puck, press Y to give up your body for the team.  Lay down in 
front of a goal-bound shot to block it. 

L Trigger: 
Press the L Trigger to change the coaching strategy. 

R Trigger: 
Press the R Trigger to change lines. 

As goalie: 

Passing: A 
Press the analog stick in the direction you want to pass and press A. 

Freeze puck (stop play): X 
When the goalie has the puck, press and hold X to freeze the puck and stop play.  A 
face-off will ensue in one of the two circles flanking the net. 

Fighting 
Punching (Jab): X 
Punching (Hard Punch): Y 
Grab Jersey: B 
Avoiding/Blocking: A 


RULES

The basic rules of hockey are explained below.  They can be toggled on and off in 
the Game Settings menu to make for a more wide-open contest.  If you want to fully 
simulate the NHL experience, set them all to on. 

Face-offs 
Cannot be toggled 
Each stoppage of play (penalties, violations, the end of periods) requires a face-
off to start again.  The ref will skate the center of the face-off circle and drop a 
puck between two opposing players.  Use the analog stick and pass button to win the 
face-off to a teammate. 

Offsides 
You cannot cross your opponents’ blue line unless you--or a teammate who has already 
crossed—is in possession of the puck.  If you do, you’ll be offsides the second the 
biscuit crosses the line.  Likewise, passing to a teammate who is across the line 
will result in offsides. 

Luckily, the computer-controlled players in NHL2K are remarkably good about staying 
on.  So are your opponents.  They will also sometimes hold you at the line to force 
offsides.  The best way to avoid this call is by passing to the player closest to 
the blue line, then taking him across before passing again. 

Note: It goes both ways!  Don’t pass back out of the zone, because as soon as the 
puck crosses the line the other way, you’ll be whistled.  When offsides is called, 
the face-off will occur between the center and blue line. 

Icing 
If you send the puck from half-ice or further, and it crosses the goal line, you 
have iced the puck.  That doesn’t mean the whistle will automatically sound.  If you 
touch the puck before your opposition, it’s all wine and roses.  If they touch up 
first, there will be a face-off in your zone.  All bets are off when you are a short-
handed team.  Ice to your heart’s content. 

Two-line pass 
If the puck crosses two lines--and is received by a player who was across the second 
line before the puck--then a two-line pass is whistled. 


PENALTIES

Whoops!  Did I do that?  Violations during play are punished by sending a player off 
the ice for a specific amount of time relative to his crime.  The player will then 
sit in the penalty box until his time runs out or the opposing team scores.  The 
team who has a player advantage is said to be on a power-play, while the team minus 
a player is short-handed.  Common hockey violations are listed below. 

Hooking: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Common 
Using your stick to hold a player or bring him to the ice.  Hooking usually occurs 
when a player who has been beaten reaches out with his stick to slow his opponent’s 
progress.  Excessive use of the poke-check button will result in hooking calls. 

Cross Checking: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Rare 
Checking any player from behind.  You may body check from the front and side, but 
hits from behind will result in two minutes in the clink. 

Interference: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Rare 
Impeding the goaltender’s ability to play a puck. This includes knocking down a 
goalie or otherwise blocking him in the crease. 

Roughing: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Common 
Excessive use of force.  Too much checking or checking away from the play will 
result in roughing calls.  Ease up, there, cowboy! 

Elbowing: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Common 
Applying one’s elbow to an opponent’s face or head.  Usually occurs when checking. 

Tripping: 
Minor—2 minutes 
Rare 
Using the stick or your leg to trip an opponent. 

Fighting: 
Major—5 minutes 
Rare 
Throwing down.  Tussling.  Dropping the gloves.  Scrapping.  Waging war. Get in a 
fight, go to the box.  Nobody cares who started it.  If the gloves come off, there’s 
gonna be some pain. You better have won, too, otherwise you’ll have five minutes to 
think about what a wuss you are. 

Game Misconduct: 
Leave the game 
Extremely rare 
Results in disqualification from competition.  This results from getting a little 
too zealous in starting fights and such.  Head to the showers, punk. 

Penalty Shot: 
This occurs when a player is on his way to the goal (theoretically to score) and is 
flagrantly obstructed from doing so.  The player then gets one shot to beat the 
goalie.  Skate from mid-ice and try to deke him silly. 


OFFENSE

Everyone wants to be on offense.  You get the stats, the glory, the paychecks.  You 
get the modeling contracts, action figures, three-picture deals.  Wait, sorry.  
That’s basketball....  Seriously, though, offense is a delicate balance of skills: 
deft skating, precision passing, and howitzer shooting.  It can be a balls-out dash 
for the goal or a ponderous, strategic set play in the zone. 

Obviously, the bottom line on offense is scoring.  No matter how you set it up, 
putting the biscuit in the basket is your ultimate GOAAAALLLLL! 



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Keep these offensive principles in mind to maximize your scoring opportunities: 

Spread out 
Making the defense cover a lot of ground is always a good idea.  It wears them out, 
gives you a lot of room to maneuver, and creates holes in their scheme as they move 
to cover.  Bringing the puck down the wings will help to ensure a spread formation. 

Don’t be afraid to pass back 
Just because you’re on offense doesn’t mean you have to always move forward to 
score.  Sometimes it’s wise to dump it back or cross to a less-populated section of 
ice.  Doing this helps you regroup and plan your next move. 

Always keep the puck moving 
This helps you accomplish the same kinds of things: opposing players will get tired 
chasing the puck.  Moving the puck keeps defenses on their heels.  Remember: offense 
is action, defense is reaction.  By keeping the puck on the move, you’ll be able to 
dictate the action.  Just keep passing to the open man.  Eventually something sweet 
will open up. 

Mix up your shots: utilize both slap shots and wrist shots 
Don’t become predictable.  If you’re always shooting wrist shots to the goalie’s 
glove side, he’ll come to expect it and be likelier to count on that behavior.  
Crank the occasional slap shot from the blue line.  Flick one from short range.  Try 
out different angles and techniques.  Soon you’ll be sending many a once-noble 
goaltender back to the minors. 

Wait for the good shot 
The first shot is not always the good shot.  If you’ve got four defenders bearing 
down on you and no one to pass it to, then, sure, take that lame little wrist shot 
and hope for the best.  However, just because you’ve got a clear path to the goal 
doesn’t mean you should automatically take it.  Look around.  Other players may be 
in a better position to score. 

Use screens 
Screens work.  In fact, a screen is usually the only way you’re going to get a long 
range shot past a quality netminder.  Here’s what you do.  Hang out near the blue 
line and wait for a player to camp out or cross in front of the goalie.  Time your 
shot so the goaltender’s view is partially obstructed.  If he can’t see it, he can’t 
stop it.  This takes some time to master, and won’t work every time, but is an 
effective addition to your arsenal. 

Know the goalies’ weaknesses 
The various goalies in the NHL have specific weaknesses that can be exploited.  
Certain netminders have less mobility and are therefore more susceptible to one-
timers, others are bad with the glove.  Learn a goalie’s weaknesses to beat him like 
a rented mule. 

Avoid the defenders’ stick side 
This one is simple—when skating the puck up the ice, and attempting to maneuver by a 
defender, pass behind him on his non-stick side.  This will cause him to turn, and 
you’ll already be safely by with the puck. 



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Setting it up 
NHL2K rewards you for setting up plays and attempting to emulate real hockey.  The 
more you move the puck around in the zone, the more scoring opportunities open up 
around the net, as defenders scramble to cover everything.  Start at the point 
(players standing on or near the blue line) and pass to the corner.  Pass in a loose 
box.  Point, corner, corner, point, other point—then seek open wings camped out in 
front.  Hit them with quick passes and one-time the puck home. 

Another strategy is to dump the puck in (Y), then charge into the corner and work 
the play from behind the net.  Get rid of the puck before you’re made into board 
pizza.  Pass to crashing wings, or those set up in front of the net for one-timer 
opportunities. 



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Scoring on a break-away 
So you’ve got the ice and you’re screaming toward the net.  Now, how to deke the 
goalie?  Scoring on a breakaway is not easy, but there are two strategies that often 
work. 

The wiggle: Head straight down the ice.  Quickly flick the analog stick back and 
forth to make the player “wiggle.”  Ideally, this will confuse the goalie, and you 
can sneak one by him along the post.  Works well against weaker netminders. 

The sweep: Head down the ice toward the side of the goalie that matches your 
forehand side.  Example: if you are a right-handed shooter, move toward the left 
side of the goal.  Right before the goal, quick fake to your backhand, then switch 
to forehand and shoot from your strong side. 



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Odd-man rushes 
An odd-man rush happens whenever you have more offensive players heading into the 
opposing zone than there are defensive men to cover.  Odd-man rushes are golden 
scoring opportunities.  And since the advantage goes to the passer in this game, odd-
man rushes are your most consistent goal source. 

Two-on-one: One defender lies between you and the other player.  You’re all moving 
toward the goal.  Skate toward the defender.  When he commits to you, pass to the 
flanking player for a one-time opportunity.  Or, let the defender commit to the 
pass, then take the puck in and shoot it yourself. 

Three-on-two: Same as above, with more passing options. 

Two-on-none: Two of you against the goaltender.  Skate toward the corner, drawing 
the goalie to your side.  A few yards before the goal, pass horizontally across the 
goal mouth to the open side of the net.  One-time it home.  Note: this is the surest 
way to score in NHL2K.  Master this technique to win. 

Three-on-none: If you don’t score on this, take a deep breath, then curse with 
everything you’ve got.  This is the equivalent of bricking a dunk. 



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On the power play 
On the power play, it is absolutely imperative to set it up in the zone.  Keep the 
puck away from the defenders by moving it quickly.  Opportunities will flash in 
front of the net.  Make crisp, accurate passes and attempt one-timers on the weak 
side of the goal. 

If defenders get ahold of the puck deep in the zone, they’ll dump it out.  You’ll 
have to go chasing.  If you see a clear about to happen, maneuver in front of the 
defender to block it. 

Short-handed 
Unless you are down by a bunch, offense in short-handed situation is not a 
priority.  Only try to score in a short-handed situation when you get a random puck 
in the middle of the ice and have a shot at a breakaway.  Otherwise, just clear the 
puck and hang on to play defense. 

DEFENSE

When you’re not on offense, you’re on defense.  As soon as the opposition gains 
control of the puck, all five (or less) of your guys should key on getting the puck 
back.  Hockey, like most sports, is about possession.  Possess the puck and you 
improve your chances of winning. 

Below are some fundamental principles that can be followed to get all that you can 
out of your defensemen. 

Don’t consistently take defenders out of position 
This may seem basic, but in the heat of battle you may get frazzled and keep taking 
defenders forward to score.  This is not to say that defenders should never shoot or 
score, but that’s not why they’re on the ice.  On offensive plays, defenders stand 
at the point and set up the plays.  Taking them deep into the offensive zone tires 
them out and forces offensive players (who aren’t used to playing defense) to try to 
protect the goal.  Use your players effectively to maximize your opportunities. 

Don’t pass in front of your own goal 
This is the equivalent of handing out assists to your opposition.  Don’t do it!  
Your goalie will thank you. 

If the action is getting hot and heavy, clear the puck 
If your netminder is getting shelled, you need to make a line change, or you feel 
otherwise woozy about your set up, clear the puck and start over.  There’s no shame 
in it. 

Don’t bunch up on the puck handler 
Bunching on the puck handler leaves other players open.  If a player is being 
covered, leave your player where he is and switch to the player nearest the puck.  
Then try to poke check it away. 

Crowd the middle 
The more traffic in front of the net, the harder it is to get a shot through the 
mire.  Be sure not to block your goalie’s view, though.  That’s how long range goals 
happen. 

Poke-checking 
Poke-checking is your most useful ally in stealing the puck from the opposition.  
Poke-check any opposing player who has the puck.  Don’t hold the button too long, 
though, or you’ll be short handed in no time. 

Body checking 
Body checking will put a player to the ice and free up the puck for your own team to 
pick up.  A body check is a commitment.  It forces you to take you stick off the ice 
momentarily as you rail someone.  Use it sparingly.  It’s best used in the corners 
and along the boards to make your foes relinquish the biscuit.  Too much (or too 
aggressive) body checking will result in roughing. 

Defending the odd-man rush 
When you are out-manned in the zone, always go the player with the puck.  This will 
force the issue.  Perhaps you can poke check the puck away, perhaps force a rushed 
pass.  If a defender is already covering the puck-handler, hang back and try to 
intercept the pass.  If you can ward off one shot, the rest of the defense should be 
back shortly to pick up the pieces. 

Short handed defense 
There are three rules to short-handed defense. 

1) Clog the area in front of the goal 
Put a lot of bodies in front of the net.  Knock down anyone who comes into this 
area. 

2) Don’t jump at the puck 
You’re fulfilling offensive wishes if you jump at the puck.  Select zone defense and 
play smart.  Poke check when players get near. 

3) Always clear 
If you get the puck when short handed, clear.  You won’t be penalized for icing. 

COACHING

Editing Lines 
When editing lines, keep player endurance in mind.  I know.  You’ve made yourself 
into this sweet player and really want to see yourself in action.  If this is the 
case, simply put yourself on the first line and turn line changes off.  Otherwise, 
make sure you put a single player on no more than two lines—one scoring, one special 
teams (power play or short-handed).  That way, all your players will be fresh for 
duty. 

Line Changes 
To execute a line change, hit the right trigger to bring up what lines are 
available.  You’ll be able to choose between three scoring lines while at full 
strength, two lines when on the power play and two when short-handed. 

In the course of play, if you’d like to make a line change, make sure you dump the 
puck into your opponent’s zone first.  Then make the change.  Otherwise, you may be 
stuck with no defenders and one very upset goalie. 

Line changes should be done once every 30 seconds or so to keep fresh.  Never let 
your players dip below yellow.  If this happens, they will not be able to keep up 
with the opposition, and giving up goals becomes very likely. 

Offensive strategies 
To modify your offensive strategy, hit the left trigger during gameplay (or during 
stoppage before a face-off), select the amount of pressure you’d like with the D-pad 
or analog, then hit A. 


Passive 
Use this when protecting a lead to save your players for defense.  Players are less 
aggressive in the offensive zone, defenders tend to hang back.  Wings less likely to 
crash the net. 
Normal 
This is the default setting.  It works well for almost every game situation, unless 
trailing or leading considerably.  A moderate amount of offensive pressure. 
Aggressive 
Use this set-up when trailing late in the third to pump up your offensive pressure.  
Pulls your defense up and changes the focus of your team to offense.  Don’t use this 
unless you have to—since all your players are pulled up, one through pass can send 
the opponent streaking toward your goal. 
In addition, use this aggressive offense to crack a particularly stingy defense.  
Increasing the pressure may be just the thing you need when a defense is controlling 
their zone.  Look to scoop up the rebounds with crashing forwards.  Of course, this 
strategy may leave you susceptible to attack, but you have to score to win, right? 

Defensive strategies 


Zone: 
Organizes your defense in a loose box that covers by area.  Utilize this defense 
when short handed to protect your goal.  Also good when your team is slower the 
opposition.  Allows for more opponent passing, but less bunching by your defense. 

Man-to-Man: 
The default setting for defense.  Matches each player to another.  Usually a safe 
bet, except when you’re consistently getting smoked by faster players.  If that 
happens, switch to zone. 

Intimidation: 
The counterpart to aggressive offense, this defense is in-your-face and abusive.  
Look for more poke and body-checking from the computer-controlled players and fierce 
(read: violent) protection of the goal.  This is a good defense to start with.  Beat 
your opponent down in the first period before settling into a more relaxed pace. 


TEAMS

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic

New Jersey Devils 

Players to watch: Martin Brodeur, Scott Stevens 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 80 
Goaltending: 81 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 79 
Checking: 82 



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New York Islanders 

Players to watch: Mariusz Czerkawski, Brad Isbister 
Overall: 72 
Offense: 72 
Defense: 72 
Goaltending: 73 
Speed: 76 
Passing: 71 
Checking: 76 



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New York Rangers 

Players to watch: Theo Fleury, Mike Richter 
Overall: 82 
Offense: 82 
Defense: 83 
Goaltending: 86 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 81 
Checking: 79 



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Philadelphia Flyers 

Players to watch: Eric Lindros, John LeClair, Mikael Renberg 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 77 
Defense: 82 
Goaltending: 80 
Speed: 79 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 85 



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Pittsburgh Penguins 

Players to watch: Jaromir Jagr, Matthew Barnaby 
Overall: 78 
Offense: 77 
Defense: 79 
Goaltending: 82 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 78 


Northeast

Boston Bruins 

Players to watch: Dave Andreychuk, Ray Bourque, Anson Carter 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 81 
Goaltending: 78 
Speed: 82 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 81 



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Buffalo Sabres 

Players to watch: Dominik Hasek, Stu Barnes 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 80 
Defense: 81 
Goaltending: 88 
Speed: 84 
Passing: 80 
Checking: 79 



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Montreal Canadiens 

Players to watch: Marty Rucinsky, Brian Savage 
Overall: 77 
Offense: 76 
Defense: 78 
Goaltending: 79 
Speed: 78 
Passing: 76 
Checking: 79 



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Ottawa Senators 

Players to watch: Daniel Alfredsson, Scott McEachern 
Overall: 82 
Offense: 82 
Defense: 83 
Goaltending: 82 
Speed: 85 
Passing: 81 
Checking: 79 



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Toronto Maple Leafs 

Players to watch: Curtis Joseph, Mats Sundin 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 81 
Defense: 80 
Goaltending: 85 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 80 
Checking: 79 


Southeast

Atlanta Thrashers 

Players to watch: Andrew Brunette, Ray Ferarro 
Overall: 72 
Offense: 72 
Defense: 72 
Goaltending: 73 
Speed: 75 
Passing: 71 
Checking: 76 



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Carolina Hurricane 

Players to watch: Ron Francis, Curtis Leschyshyn, Gary Roberts 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 79 
Defense: 80 
Goaltending: 81 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 79 



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Florida Panthers 

Players to watch: Mike Vernon, Pavel Bure, Rob Niedermayer 
Overall: 78 
Offense: 77 
Defense: 78 
Goaltending: 83 
Speed: 79 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 80 



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Tampa Bay Lightning 

Players to watch: Darren Puppa, Chris Gratton 
Overall: 74 
Offense: 74 
Defense: 75 
Goaltending: 78 
Speed: 77 
Passing: 74 
Checking: 74 



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Washington Capitals 

Players to watch: Adam Oates, Steve Konowalchuk 
Overall: 78 
Offense: 77 
Defense: 78 
Goaltending: 82 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 79 


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central

Chicago Blackhawks 

Players to watch: Eric Daze, Tony Amonte, Alexei Zhamnov 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 79 
Defense: 80 
Goaltending: 79 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 79 
Checking: 77 



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Detroit Red Wings 

Players to watch: Brendan Shanahan, Igor Larionov, Chris Osgood 
Overall: 82 
Offense: 83 
Defense: 83 
Goaltending: 84 
Speed: 84 
Passing: 83 
Checking: 78 



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Nashville Predators 

Players to watch: Patric Kjellberg, Robert Valicevic 
Overall: 73 
Offense: 73 
Defense: 74 
Goaltending: 77 
Speed: 80 
Passing: 75 
Checking: 72 



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St. Louis Blues 

Players to watch: Al McInnis, Pavol Demitra, Michal Handzus 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 83 
Goaltending: 80 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 80 
Checking: 79 


Northwest

Calgary Flames 

Players to watch: Valeri Bure, Grant Fuhr 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 81 
Goaltending: 85 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 79 
Checking: 79 



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Colorado Avalanche 

Players to watch: Patrick Roy, Peter Forsberg 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 79 
Defense: 81 
Goaltending: 82 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 79 
Checking: 80 



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Edmonton Oilers 

Players to watch: Doug Weight, Todd Marchant, Roman Hamrlik 
Overall: 77 
Offense: 75 
Defense: 79 
Goaltending: 82 
Speed: 83 
Passing: 77 
Checking: 80 



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Vancouver Canucks 

Players to watch: Mark Messier, Alexander Mogilny, Todd Bertuzzi 
Overall: 77 
Offense: 77 
Defense: 77 
Goaltending: 81 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 77 
Checking: 78 


Pacific

Anaheim Mighty Ducks 

Players to watch: Paul Kariya, Teemu Selanne, Oleg Tverdovsky 
Overall: 79 
Offense: 79 
Defense: 79 
Goaltending: 84 
Speed: 82 
Passing: 80 
Checking: 78 



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Dallas Stars 

Players to watch: Brett Hull, Ed Belfour 
Overall: 83 
Offense: 82 
Defense: 85 
Goaltending: 81 
Speed: 82 
Passing: 80 
Checking: 83 



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Los Angeles Kings 

Players to watch: Bryan Smolinski, Rob Blake, Zigmund Palffy 
Overall: 78 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 80 
Goaltending: 79 
Speed: 81 
Passing: 78 
Checking: 77 



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Phoenix Coyotes 

Players to watch: Jeremy Roenick, Keith Tkachuk, Dallas Drake 
Overall: 78 
Offense: 78 
Defense: 79 
Goaltending: 78 
Speed: 80 
Passing: 77 
Checking: 80 



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San Jose Sharks 

Players to watch: Owen Nolan, Vincent Damphousse, Alexander Korolyuk 
Overall: 80 
Offense: 79 
Defense: 82 
Goaltending: 79 
Speed: 82 
Passing: 79 
Checking: 81 





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